9

If I have multiple footnote citations of the same reference on the same page I get multiple footnote entries with exactly the same content.

\begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib}
@article{test,
    title = {Synthesis of Enantiopure Alcohols},
    volume = {71},
    number = {17},
    journal = {J. Org. Chem.},
    author = {Test T.},
    month = aug,
    year = {2006},
    pages = {6333--6445}
}
\end{filecontents*}

\documentclass{report}
\usepackage[backend=biber]{biblatex}
\addbibresource{\jobname.bib}
\begin{document}

First\footfullcite{test}, second\footfullcite{test} and third time.\footfullcite{test}

\end{document}

Example footnote

I find this to look weird and wondered if something like this was possible:

1,2,3 Test T. “Synthesis of Enantiopure Alcohols”. In: J. Org. Chem. 71.17 (Aug. 2006), pp. 6333–6445.

If the output in my minimal example is completely normal I am happy to leave it that way - I would just like to hear some opinions on this.

UPDATE: I have done some further research on this and I reckoned it would be the simplest if a footnote citation occurred twice on a page it would get the same footnote.

First\footfullcite{test}, second\footfullcite{test} and third time.\footfullcite{test}

would give

First [1], second [1] and third.[1]

Conclusion: My first proposal is very hard to achieve and unnecessary complicated. The solution using "ibid" solves this problem in a different but effective way. If one did not want to use "ibid", Audreys post solves the problem very nicely, too.

  • 2
    i don't use biblatex, so can 't comment on that, but the more usual "extra" footnote content would be "Ibid.", i believe. – barbara beeton Jul 19 '13 at 18:18
  • Alternatively, you could keep referring to the same reference like @lockstep does here: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/11523/… The question this question links to as a duplicate is also useful here. – Emiel Jul 19 '13 at 18:33
  • 2
    Well, by using \footfullcite (or even \fullcite), you are telling biblatex to give the full reference regardless of any other considerations. There are other ways around this, but using \footfullcite in each case is making a solution harder, not easier. – jon Jul 19 '13 at 21:29
  • 1
    It isn't clear what you're trying to achieve. If you want the full citation footnotes to recur on each new page, then that problem has been solved already. – Audrey Jul 21 '13 at 19:01
10

Probably using the authoryear-ibid style and using first \footfullcite and then only \footcite is a little better.

Modifying your MWE to:

\begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib}
@article{test,
    title = {Synthesis of Enantiopure Alcohols},
    volume = {71},
    number = {17},
    journal = {J. Org. Chem.},
    author = {Test T.},
    month = aug,
    year = {2006},
    pages = {6333--6445}
}
\end{filecontents*}

\documentclass{report}
\usepackage[style=authoryear-ibid,backend=biber]{biblatex}
\addbibresource{\jobname.bib}
\begin{document}

First\footfullcite{test}, second\footcite{test} and third time.\footcite{test}

\end{document}

you obtain this result:

enter image description here

The best way, as suggested by Audrey, would be, anyway, to use the verbose-ibid style and simply use \footcite for all the citations.

\documentclass{report}
\usepackage[style=verbose-ibid,backend=biber]{biblatex}
\addbibresource{\jobname.bib}
\begin{document}

First\footcite{test}, second\footcite{test} and third time.\footcite{test}

\end{document}
  • 3
    There is no need to track first citations manually - replace authoryear-ibid with, say, verbose-ibid and use \footcite (or \autocite) throughout. – Audrey Jul 20 '13 at 15:01
  • @Audrey, you're right (as usual). I've added your suggestion to the answer. – karlkoeller Jul 20 '13 at 15:11
  • If I needed to use the chem-angew style, this solution would not be an option, right? – gncs Jul 21 '13 at 11:54
  • 1
    @gncs Try calling biblatex as follows and see if the result is what you need: \usepackage[citestyle=verbose-ibid,bibstyle=chem-angew,backend=biber]{biblatex}‌​ – karlkoeller Jul 21 '13 at 14:53

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