5

Besides defining longer technical words by

\newcommand{\trimam}{trans-impedance-amplifier}

to save typing time.

Is there a Latex Editor (can be Linux or Windows) that offers "word completion"

https://help.libreoffice.org/Writer/Word_Completion_for_Text_Documents

similar like Libreoffice or Word. For technical documents \newcommand might be better changing a technical term afterwards through the whole document. But for prose text I would prefer a "word completion" feature indexing already used words and offering shortcut completion when typing first three letters.

  • 7
    See LaTeX Editors/IDEs for a long list. I would assume that most editors support word completion. Emacs/AUCTeX definitely does. – alexurba Aug 15 '13 at 14:51
  • 2
    Kile does this. – Torbjørn T. Aug 15 '13 at 14:51
  • 2
    While I don't recommend it, there is nothing that prevents you from using Word to create your LaTeX source files, if you save them in text mode. Then, you just need a separate window through which to invoke LaTeX upon your newly-created Word text document. I'm not being facetious ... I use such an approach, sans Word as the editor. – Steven B. Segletes Aug 15 '13 at 15:08
  • 3
    vim with SuperTab-plugin does. There is a plugin for everything, even thesaurus. – schmendrich Aug 15 '13 at 15:32
  • 3
    And of course, in the same feuding boat as Vim, Emacs has this feature (out of the box, I believe). – Sean Allred Aug 16 '13 at 4:29
10

In Windows, WinEdt offers this feature. You write few letters of a word and then press Ctrl + Enter. A pop-up window will show you the possible list of words as in the following figure.

enter image description here

Double clicking on the desired word will insert it in the place.


Sublimetext

Sublime text too has this feature. But I found that its word completion is not as thorough as WinEdt. For example it didn't know the completion for the word assume as I did in winedt. But, may be we have to do something extra to have all words, which I never explored. Here you have to press few letters of the word and then press Ctrl + Space to view the options as in the figure. Then click on the desired word to get it in place.

PS. Pressing Tab will insert the first word in the above list i.e, hamburgers.

enter image description here


Texmaker

In texmaker, right click on the half completed word, a pop-up window will open with possible suggestions. Click on the desired word to insert it. Same works in TeXstudio also.

enter image description here


TeXnicCenter

Though I could not get it work (as I am not good in using TeXnicCenter), there is an option for completing words.

enter image description here

Those who know, please feel free to edit and add details.


gedit

gedit with the "word completion" plugin activated, it shows a dynamic list of possible matches.


  • thanks for the nice overview. One correction, it seems TexnicCenter (I use this one currently) has only code completion, but no word completion, so only "/word/" gets completed – James Last Aug 16 '13 at 9:09
  • I am using texstudio which is excellent but I could not find this feature. Would you help me to activate this feature? – prashanta_himalay Jan 27 '16 at 15:48
  • @prashanta_himalay Texstudio is similar to texmaker. Right click on the incomplete word. – user11232 Jan 30 '16 at 1:06
  • @HarishKumar True. But I was not getting the same thing in my Ubuntu version. But checked with other Linux and it is working fine. – prashanta_himalay Jan 30 '16 at 6:21
6

Emacs can also do this, for example using Toby Cubitt's predictive mode. There are a bunch of other modes that can also help, as well.

enter image description here

Other options include AutoComplete and company-mode

Even more options are listed in the Emacswiki Completion Category page

1

TeXWorks also have the ability to complete the words included in a word list file, which is located in ~/.TeXworks/completion/ as a simple file text (like word_list.txt).

And as said before, Kile does it to, with a word_list.cwl located in ~/.kde/share/apps/kile/complete/dictionary/ (then go to the settings to add this file to auto-completion).

0

In February 2013, the online editor ShareLaTeX introduced auto-completion for already-used commands within your document:

enter image description here

Future improvements may include scanning packages that are loaded to add to the available auto-completion selection.

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