8

I have a quick question on how to reference organizations that contain more than one word.

For example, I am using this syntax,

@misc{Directive2010,
address = {Brussels},
author = {European Parliament and Council of the European Union},
keywords = {Manual,fix},
mendeley-tags = {Manual,fix},
number = {4},
pages = {1--12},
publisher = {European Parliament},
title = {{Directive 2010/30/EU}},
year = {2010}
}

The output I get in the text is: (Parliament and of the European Union, 2010)

and I want it to show as: (European Parliament and Council of the European Union, 2010)

Thank you for your help!!

7

If you want BibTeX to treat something as a single token, you will want to enclose it in braces (i.e., {}). So you will want to write:

@misc{Directive2010,
address = {Brussels},
author = {{European Parliament and Council of the European Union}},
keywords = {Manual,fix},
mendeley-tags = {Manual,fix},
number = {4},
pages = {1--12},
publisher = {European Parliament},
title = {{Directive 2010/30/EU}},
year = {2010}
}

BibTeX treats any occurrence of "and" in the author field as a delimiter that separates authors unless you enclose it in braces, like the above code does.

  • appendix to the answer: BibTex also treats the first word in general and after every and as a forename. The output inside the TOC would be Parliament, E. and of the European Union, C. without use of {...} – Ben Aug 29 '17 at 16:57
  • @Ben That's not always true. Depending on how you enter names, the first word and all first words after the delimiter and could be treated as either the "von" part of a name or the surname (e.g., Smith, Mary and van Beethoven, Ludwig). See this answer to How should I type author names in a bib file? for the different ways to enter names. – Adam Liter Aug 29 '17 at 17:49
  • Oh... you are right. But since there isn't a comma in this case, BibTex does as I told. – Ben Aug 29 '17 at 20:33

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