991

If you were asked to show examples of beautifully typeset documents in TeX & friends, what would you suggest? Preferably documents available online (I'm aware I could go to a bookstore and find many such documents called 'books'). Extra bonus for documents whose LaTeX source is available.

This is not an idle question. Seeing great examples of any craft is both educational and inspiring, let alone explaining why we prefer TeX to Word or other text editors.

For instance, I like how Philipp Lehman's Font Installation Guide looks. I don't know enough LaTeX to realize how much customization was done, but the ToC looks polished.

Your nominations, please ...

8
  • 18
    Interestingly, the font installation guide probably doesn’t even have that many customizations, at least by the looks of it. Rather, the polished looks come from a very few choice adjustments. Aug 8, 2010 at 8:53
  • 12
    I really like the microtype manual PDF. Since it's nicely using PDF features like layers and such to create an appealing document. Aug 15, 2010 at 14:46
  • 3
    It seems to me that the font installation guide was set-up in a more elaborated way in previous versions. Am I missing something or confused with another document?
    – pluton
    Oct 1, 2010 at 2:18
  • 1
  • 3
    Most of the links given in answers lead to 404!
    – hola
    May 31, 2017 at 6:34

100 Answers 100

15

I had to make a large poster for a conference and I used the style file baposter (link) to do it. Here's a preview:

Poster

The options look like:

\begin{poster}%
  % Poster Options
  {
  % Show grid to help with alignment
  grid=no,
  % Column spacing
  colspacing=1em,
  % Color style
  bgColorOne=lighteryellow,
  bgColorTwo=lightestyellow,
  borderColor=reddishyellow,
  headerColorOne=yellow,
  headerColorTwo=reddishyellow,
  headerFontColor=black,
  boxColorOne=lightyellow,
  boxColorTwo=lighteryellow,
  % Format of textbox
  %textborder=roundedleft,
  textborder =rounded,
%  textborder=rectangle,
  % Format of text header
  eyecatcher=no,
  headerborder=open,
  headerheight=0.14\textheight,
  headershape=roundedright,
  headershade=plain,
  headerfont=\Large\textsf, %Sans Serif
  boxshade=plain,
%  background=shade-tb,
  background=plain,
  linewidth=2pt
  }

The PDF version can be downloaded here.

You place the boxes using relative coordinates such as below contribution (where contribution is the name of a box). Here's a example:

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
  \headerbox{\bfseries Results}{name=Results,column=0,span=2,above=Procedure,below=Contribution}{
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
15

If you were asked to show examples of beautifully typeset documents in LaTeX, what would you suggest?

This is my rendering of a long-ago torture test of technical text (say that three times fast!).

benchmark1 benchmark2

I think the technical material came out fine-looking, certainly up to anyone's professional standards, but the biggest point for me is that getting LaTeX to do it was straightforward.

Personally, when I was first shown some of the wonderful things that TeX could put out I was amazed at what other people could do. But when I saw the original version of this document in the AMS Notices then I was delighted at what I could do. :-)

Preferably documents available online ... Extra bonus for documents whose LaTeX source is available.

Yes, in the same directory.

4
  • 13
    The link does not work. May 30, 2011 at 18:29
  • Dunno. Works for me now. Mar 1, 2012 at 1:01
  • 3
    @JimHefferon: The link is still broken.
    – Werner
    Feb 27, 2014 at 16:57
  • 1
    The following link seems to have the document, plus a zip of the source. I'm on an iPad so couldn't check the source. joshua.smcvt.edu/bcs Jul 22, 2014 at 1:35
15

While studying engineering mechanics I’ve come across a beautiful integral combination chart (german “Koppeltafel”) that is used to calculate the integral of two given functions multiplied. Sadly it was a bad quality scan. So I rebuilt the whole thing with lots of attention to detail in the math and the drawings and using accurate graphs. The LaTeX / TikZ code is approx. 1000 lines long and at some points I even use custom symbols embedded as pdf files (e.g. the \ell is customized).

PDF download here

integrals combination chart

14

Check this out. Reply if you want the TeX file or instructions.

enter image description here

4
  • 8
    Well if you have the source code couldn't you just post it? I, for sure, am interested :-) Dec 26, 2014 at 22:27
  • 4
    I second that thought. Mar 19, 2015 at 19:35
  • 3
    Its nice, please share the code
    – Freeman
    Feb 3, 2019 at 9:13
  • 2
    Beautiful, please share the source code.
    – kalakay
    May 3, 2020 at 13:45
13

This is only somewhat related, but Springer lets you search their journals for strings of latex. This can help you understand how to format certain commands (and decide whether it is done well or not): http://www.latexsearch.com/

13

Some of you may be interested in Cours d’analyse although it is far from being as fancy as some of documents already mentioned. It is a bit too dense and comments are welcome. The final code is probably very nasty. Anyway.

3
  • 1
    +1 for CC licensed. I also love the use of orange hues in the document. Really great. Sep 23, 2010 at 7:58
  • 2
    I do appreciate, even if I agree about the density of the text... et que cela ne me rappelle pas que des bons souvenirs de prépa ! Anyway, I'd like to know more about the way you achieve the rendering of Exercices or Lemmes blocks!
    – ebosi
    Jul 7, 2016 at 12:18
  • 1
    This is inspired by The Legrand Orange Book.
    – Watson
    Jan 6, 2021 at 7:56
13

I just picked these three from our archives.

  • Matthew Mac Namara, La Textualisation de Madame Bovary, Rodopi, New York, 2004, 9042009845

Page from the transcription of Flaubert's manuscript, collating the notes to show the sequence of authorial progress

  • [Carlo Collodi], Éachtra Phinocchio, tr. Pádraig Ó Buachalla, ed Seán Ó Suilleabháin ⁊ Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Random House / Coiste Litriochta Mhuscrai, 2nd ed, 2003, 0954455401

Chapter 2 of Pinocchio (in Irish). This edition was typeset to fit exactly the page layout and numbering of all the other language versions, with the images added afterwards by the printer. The challenge was that the Irish language version contains many more words than any other version!

  • Seán Connolly, Bede: On The Temple, Liverpool University Press, 1995, B001DP4V3S

A page from the analysis of Bede's book, with an authorial requirement that the footnote contained a triangular arrany of numbers.

2
  • Any chance Pinocchio's adventures could be typeset using the 'eiad' characters ( irish alphabet to the uninitiated)...
    – Leeser
    Jan 23, 2015 at 19:16
  • I don't see why not, but Yannis' decorative initial would probably be better replaced with a different one. The problem with that edition was that we were constrained to keep the same illustrations on the same pages in the same place as all the other language editions, which meant a lot of fiddling with point sizes of text to make it fall in the right places. I'd have to do the same with the eiad font. I'll have a look. edit I would of course have to check with the editor about copyright before I could actually distribute it. Jan 28, 2015 at 23:06
13

A good comparison of MS Word vs. LaTex was done by Matthias Mühlich who wrote twice the same text (without any formula or table or anything one expects LaTex to shine) in both formats and converted them to pdf.

Just print out 1 and 2, and decide for yourself.

enter image description here

3
  • 1
    I love this explicit juxtaposition of the results. It speaks for itself!
    – Count Zero
    Sep 14, 2011 at 20:54
  • Indeed, with a good use of interline spacing, I think that World could do in this case a good job too.
    – projetmbc
    Jun 15, 2014 at 10:11
  • 1
    @projetmbc Could do, yes. But isn't part of the point what the default looks like? I'm guessing that the LaTeX version is not far from default - presumably babel or something must be loaded with German hyphenation, and it is using type1 fonts rather than the defaults, but I doubt there is much by way of tweaking line spacing going on. And it is not just the line spacing - it is also the line breaks and lack of hyphenation in the Word version. But I would for sure be interested to see what this looks like with Word's current defaults. (At least the font would differ.)
    – cfr
    Jan 3, 2015 at 3:18
13

I'm working on an etymological approach of the Wycliffe's translation of the Bible to English language.

The project's been written mostly in lua and compiled with LuaLaTeX engine, and can be checked here: The Wycliffe Holy Bible Project.

Fist sprite

Second sprite

12

(Pentagonal tiling)

I draw 15 type of pentagonal tiling.

\documentclass{report}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{calc}

\begin{document}

\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,scale=1.1]
\foreach \x in {0,3,6,9,12,15} 
    \draw[line width=1pt,pink] (0,\x) -- (9,\x);
\foreach \x in {0,3,6,9}
    \draw[line width=1pt,pink] (\x,0) -- (\x,15);
\draw[line width=1pt,pink] (0,0) -- (9,0) -- (9,15) -- (0,15) -- cycle;  

\foreach \x in {0,3,6} 
  \foreach \y in {3,6,...,15}
  \draw[pink,line width=1pt] (\x,\y-.3) rectangle (\x+.3,\y);


\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (.15,2.85)  node {\tiny $1$}; 
\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (3.15,2.85)  node {\tiny $2$}; 
\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (6.15,2.85)  node {\tiny $3$}; 


\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (.15,5.85)  node {\tiny $4$}; 
\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (3.15,5.85)  node {\tiny $5$}; 
\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (6.15,5.85)  node {\tiny $6$}; 

\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (.15,8.85)  node {\tiny $7$}; 
\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (3.15,8.85)  node {\tiny $8$}; 
\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (6.15,8.85)  node {\tiny $9$};

\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (.15,11.85)  node {\tiny $10$}; 
\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (3.15,11.85)  node {\tiny $11$}; 
\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (6.15,11.85)  node {\tiny $12$};

\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (.15,14.85)  node {\tiny $13$}; 
\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (3.15,14.85)  node {\tiny $14$}; 
\draw[pink,line width=1pt] (6.15,14.85)  node {\tiny $15$};


    \draw (1.5,1.5) node {
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 1
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.5]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (15:27mm) $) coordinate (B) node[right] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!26mm!-67:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[above] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!11mm!-113:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [left] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!17mm!-125:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [left] {$E$};

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [blue](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,above right] {$c$};
\draw [green](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,above] {$d$};
\draw (D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,left] {$e$};
\draw[red](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,below left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);


\draw (1,-.9) node{$\widehat{B}+\widehat{C}=180^\circ$};
\draw (1,-1.5) node{$\widehat{A}+\widehat{D}+\widehat{E}=360^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}    
    };

\draw (4.5,1.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 2
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.5]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (25:15mm) $) coordinate (B) node[right] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!14mm!-120:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[above] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!30mm!-95:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [left] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!14mm!-60:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [left] {$E$};

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [blue](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,right] {$c$};
\draw [green](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,above] {$d$};
\draw [blue](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,left] {$e$};
\draw[red](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,below left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);


\draw (.4,-.9) node{$c=e$};
\draw (.4,-1.5) node{$\widehat{B}+\widehat{D}=180^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};
\draw (7.5,1.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 3
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.5]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (-18:24mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!8mm!-105:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[right] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!26mm!-120:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [above] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!18mm!-120:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [left] {$E$};

\draw ($(C)!8mm!-120:(B)$) coordinate (BC);



\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [blue](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,below right] {$c$};
\draw [green](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,above right] {$d$};
\draw (D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,above] {$e$};
\draw[pink](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,below left] {$a$};

\draw[blue] (C) -- (BC);
\draw (D) -- (BC);

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);

\draw[fill] (BC) circle (.6pt);

\draw (1,-1.5) node{$a=b,\;d=c+e$};
\draw (1,-2.2) node{$\widehat{A}=\widehat{C}=\widehat{D}=120^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};


\draw (1.5,4.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 4
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.5]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[left] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (-90:11mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!11mm!-90:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[below] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!22mm!-140:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [right] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!22mm!-90:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [above] {$E$};

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,left] {$b$};
\draw [pink] (B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,below] {$c$};
\draw [blue] (C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,below right] {$d$};
\draw [blue] (D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,above right] {$e$};
\draw   (E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);


\draw (1,-1.9) node{$b=c,\;d=e$};
\draw (1,-2.5) node{$\widehat{B}=\widehat{D}=90^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};
\draw (4.5,4.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 5
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.5]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:29mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!7mm!-120:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[right] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!15mm!-135:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [right] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!15mm!-120:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [above] {$E$};

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw (B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,below right] {$c$};
\draw [blue](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,right] {$d$};
\draw [blue](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,above] {$e$};
\draw[pink](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);


\draw (1.2,-.9) node{$a=b,\;d=e$};
\draw (1.2,-1.5) node{$\widehat{A}=60^\circ,\;\widehat{D}=120^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};
\draw (7.5,4.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 6
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.6]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:22mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!22mm!-40:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[above] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!9mm!-125:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [above] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!9mm!-140:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [left] {$E$};

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [blue](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,above right] {$c$};
\draw [blue](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,above] {$d$};
\draw [pink](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,left] {$e$};
\draw[pink](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,below left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);


\draw (.8,-.9) node{$a=d=e,\;b=c$};
\draw (.8,-1.5) node{$\widehat{B}+\widehat{D}=180^\circ,\;2\widehat{B}=\widehat{E}$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}

};


\draw (1.5,7.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 7
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.5]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:17mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!17mm!-140:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[right] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!17mm!-135:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [above] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!17mm!-90:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [above] {$E$};

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [pink](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,below right] {$c$};
\draw [pink](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,right] {$d$};
\draw [pink](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,above] {$e$};
\draw[blue](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);


\draw (1,-.9) node{$b=c=d=e$};
\draw (1,-1.6) node{$\widehat{B}+2\widehat{E}=2\widehat{C}+\widehat{D}=360^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};
\draw (4.5,7.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 8
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.4]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:22mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!22mm!-110:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[right] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!22mm!-140:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [above] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!22mm!-70:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [left] {$E$};

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [pink](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,right] {$c$};
\draw [pink](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,right] {$d$};
\draw [pink](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,above left] {$e$};
\draw[blue](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);


\draw (1,-.9) node{$b=c=d=e$};
\draw (1,-1.6) node{$2\widehat{B}+\widehat{C}=\widehat{D}+2\widehat{E}=360^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};
\draw (7.5,7.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 9
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.4]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:25mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!25mm!-75:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[right] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!25mm!-150:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [above] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!25mm!-60:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [left] {$E$};

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [pink](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,right] {$c$};
\draw [pink](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,above right] {$d$};
\draw [pink](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,left] {$e$};
\draw[blue](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);


\draw (1,-1) node{$b=c=d=e$};
\draw (1,-1.7) node{$2\widehat{A}+\widehat{C}=\widehat{D}+2\widehat{E}=360^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};


\draw (1.5,10.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 10
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.5]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:29.9mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!6mm!-110:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[right] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!18mm!-125:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [right] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!23mm!-145:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [above] {$E$};

\draw ($ (A) + (0:23mm) $) coordinate (AA);
\draw ($(A) + (90:6mm)$) coordinate (EE);

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [blue](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,below right] {$c$};
\draw [pink](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,right] {$d$};
\draw [pink](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,above] {$e$};
\draw[white](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,left] {\color{pink} $a$};


\draw[pink] (A) -- (AA);
\draw[blue] (B) -- (AA);
\draw (C) -- (D); 
\draw[pink] (D) -- (E);
\draw[pink] (E) -- (EE); 
\draw[blue] (A) -- (EE);

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);

\draw[fill] (AA) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (EE) circle (.6pt);

\draw (1.3,-.9) node{$a=b=c+e$};
\draw (1.3,-1.55) node{$\widehat{A}=90^\circ,\;\widehat{B}+\widehat{E}=180^\circ$};
\draw (1.3,-2.2) node{
$\widehat{B}+2\widehat{C}=360^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}

};
\draw (4.5,10.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 11
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.7]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:23.4mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!9mm!-150:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[right] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!18mm!-60:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [above] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!18mm!-120:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [above] {$E$};


\draw ($(C)!9mm!-60:(B)$) coordinate (CC);
\draw ($(CC)!4.5mm!0:(D)$ ) coordinate (CCC);
\draw ($(D)!4.5mm!0:(E)$) coordinate (DD);
\draw ($(DD)!4.5mm!0:(E)$) coordinate (DDD);



\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [pink](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,below right] {$c$};
\draw [pink](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,above] {$d$};
\draw [pink](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,above] {$e$};
\draw[blue](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,left] {$a$};


\draw[blue] (D) -- (DD);
\draw[blue] (DDD) -- (DD);
\draw[blue] (CC) -- (CCC);
\draw[blue] (CCC) -- (D);


\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);






\draw[fill] (CC) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (CCC) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (DD) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (DDD) circle (.6pt); 



\draw (1.5,-.8) node {$2a+c=d=e$ };
\draw (1.5,-1.45) node {$\widehat{A}=90^\circ,\;2\widehat{B}+\widehat{C}=360^\circ$};
\draw (1.5,-2.1) node {$\widehat{C}+\widehat{E}=180^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};
\draw (7.5,10.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 12
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.6]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:15mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!17mm!-155:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[right] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!26mm!-50:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [above] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!9mm!-115:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [left] {$E$};

\draw ($(C)!17mm! 0:(D)$) coordinate (CC);


\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw  (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [pink](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,below] {$c$};
\draw [pink](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,above] {$d$};
\draw [pink](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,above left] {$e$};
\draw[green](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,left] {$a$};

\draw[pink] (C) -- (CC);
\draw[blue] (CC) -- (D);
\draw[blue] (D) -- (E);


\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);

\draw[fill] (CC) circle (.6pt);

\draw (1.4,-.9) node{$2a=d=c+e$};
\draw (1.4,-1.55) node{$\widehat{A}=90^\circ,\;2\widehat{B}+\widehat{C}=360^\circ$}; 
\draw (1.4,-2.2) node{$\widehat{C}+\widehat{E}=180^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};


\draw (1.5,13.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 13
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.6]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:25mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!4.5mm!-90:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[above] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!24mm!-120:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [above] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!12mm!-120:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [left] {$E$};

\draw ($(C)!12mm!0:(D)$) coordinate (CC);

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw  (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [blue](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,right] {$c$};
\draw [pink](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,above] {$d$};
\draw [pink](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,above] {$e$};
\draw[pink](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,below left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);

\draw[fill] (CC) circle (.6pt);

\draw (1,-.9) node{$d=2a=2e$};
\draw (1,-1.55) node{$\widehat{B}=\widehat{E}=90^\circ$};
\draw (1,-2.2) node{$2\widehat{A}+\widehat{D}=360^\circ$};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};
\draw (4.5,13.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 14
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.6]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:24.3mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!9mm!-145.34:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[right] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!18mm!-69.32:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [above] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!18mm!-124.66:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [left] {$E$};

\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;

\draw ($(E)!9mm!0:(D)$) coordinate (EE);
\draw ($(D)!9mm!0:(C)$) coordinate (DD);

\draw (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [pink](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,below right] {$c$};
\draw [pink](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,above] {$d$};
\draw [pink](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,above] {$e$};
\draw[blue](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);

\draw[fill] (EE) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (DD) circle (.6pt);


\draw (1.4,-.9) node{$2a=2c=d=e,\,\widehat{A}=90^\circ$};
\draw (1.4,-1.55) node{$\widehat{B}\simeq 145.34^\circ,\, 
\widehat{C}\simeq 69.32^\circ$};
\draw (1.4,-2.2) node{$
 \widehat{D}\simeq 124.66^\circ,\, 
\widehat{E}\simeq 110.68^\circ$
%%(2\widehat{B}+\widehat{C}=360^\circ,\; \widehat{C}+\widehat{E}=180^\circ)
};
\end{tiny}


\end{tikzpicture}
};
\draw (7.5,13.5) node {%
%%%%%%Pentagon Type 15
\begin{tikzpicture}[line join=round,line width=1.2pt,scale=.6]
\begin{tiny}
\draw (0,0) coordinate (A) node[below] {$A$};
\draw ($ (A) + (0:21mm) $) coordinate (B) node[below] {$B$};
\draw ($(B)!10.5mm!-60:(A)$) coordinate (C) node[right] {$C$};
\draw ($(C)!21mm!-135:(B)$) coordinate (D) node [above] {$D$};
\draw ($(D)!10.5mm!-105:(C)$) coordinate (E) node [left] {$E$};

\draw ($(A)!10.5mm!0:(B)$) coordinate (AA);


\draw[fill=yellow!20,yellow!20] (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- (D) -- (E) -- cycle;


\draw [pink] (A) -- (B) node[pos=.5,below] {$b$};
\draw [pink](B) -- (C) node[pos=.5,right] {$c$};
\draw [blue](C) -- (D) node[pos=.5,above] {$d$};
\draw [pink](D) -- (E) node[pos=.5,left] {$e$};
\draw[pink](E) -- (A) node[pos=.5,below left] {$a$};

\draw[fill] (A) circle (.6pt); 
\draw[fill] (B) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (C) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (D) circle (.6pt);
\draw[fill] (E) circle (.6pt);

\draw[fill] (AA) circle (.6pt);

\draw (.7,-.9) node{$a=c=e,\;b=2a$};
\draw (.7,-1.55) node{$
\widehat{E}=90^\circ,
\widehat{A}=150^\circ,
\widehat{B}=60^\circ$};
\draw (.7,-2.2) node{$
\widehat{C}=135^\circ,\;\widehat{D}=105^\circ$};
\end{tiny}
\end{tikzpicture}
};    
\end{tikzpicture}

\end{document}

enter image description here

12

A page from class notes I used to teach differential equations. Figure created with pgfplots. Colors are easily matched with color definitions. Done with a humble experience/knowledge in LaTeX.

class notes

3
  • 1
    Nice! Is the source available? Mar 30, 2015 at 11:51
  • For 'pgfplots'?
    – jak123
    Mar 30, 2015 at 13:26
  • Would you be willing to share the code for your class notes? I am very interested in the plots. Bu the book code would also be very useful. THANKS!!!
    – Ashish
    May 8, 2020 at 15:44
11

A few years ago I struggled with the problem of annotating Byron's comic masterpiece "Don Juan". I finally managed to torture the Memoir class sufficiently to produce the attached. Beautiful? The only reason I claim your attention is because I've never seen an adequate annotation of extended verse (in terra-rima stanzas or in any other format). My objective was, once, to emulate the fabulous Isaac Asimov annotation (Doubleday, 1972. Illus. Milton Glaser). But, in a way, I'm content that wonderful work remains non-pareil. enter image description here enter image description here

The annotated Canto III (pdf, 2.1mb) is here

10

The handbook for the memoir class showcases quite a few different layouts, some of which I would call quite beautiful.

10

Here's an example from a series of posters I designed, displaying quotes about science. The posters all have the same basic design and are to be printed on A3 paper.

Poster

1
  • 1
    Interesting quote! is there a link to the source/list of quotes?
    – Tássio
    Sep 29, 2017 at 14:52
10

A poster about "Automata and Computability" for my students. It's in Dutch thus most people wont understand that much about it. It is an A0 poster, something most WYSIWIG magic will never achieve to edit conveniently.

poster on automata and computibility

pdf and tex are available. Feel free to fork/issue/pull request.

In order to make typesetting more conveniently, I wrote a package called preziposters, although it is still under development.

A physical copy is hanging in my office.

Using the same package, this poster - about Graph theory and Combinatorial Optimization - was made (still in beta):

poster graph theory and combinatorial optimization

(pdf)

9
  • The pdf file contains 0 bytes. Nov 19, 2014 at 1:09
  • Fixed, a cron script normally compiles the poster each day (to synchronize updates), but apparently, something went wrong this time. Nov 19, 2014 at 2:02
  • Thanks. BTW, I looked at other posters (which are very nice) in your git repository and ‘Fundamentals of Computer Science’ is rather empty. Is it not finished (yet)? Nov 19, 2014 at 11:54
  • 1
    The pdf is still 0 bytes.
    – Sverre
    May 21, 2015 at 12:37
  • 3
    @Willem Van Onsem: "This account has been disabled"
    – lblb
    Mar 22, 2017 at 17:00
10

I think this list shoul definitely include The Not So Short Introduction to LaTeX 2e. It is the book with which I started to learn LaTeX. It has no bells and whistles, but a very clean and pleasant layout, which is the philosophy of LaTeX. If I wanted to show off fonts and fancy pictures I would probably rather go for a document created in Adobe InDesign.

example

10

I like to get ideas from http://data.imf.au.dk/system/latex/bog/version3/beta/ltxb-2011-09-13-20-10.pdf

example1 example2

Although it's in Danish and sometimes maybe a bit too colorful or crowded, I really like what he has done.

2
  • That is indeed so much color. Hm.
    – henry
    Nov 30, 2018 at 8:23
  • 1
    Is the template available anywhere?
    – Watson
    Jan 6, 2021 at 8:06
10

Not sure if this counts as "great typesetting" but I am quite satisfied of how my lecture notes turned out. I am using the tufte-book document class and used titlesec and titletoc to modify the appearance of the sections. I do heavy usage of tcolorbox for theorems, examples and definitions. Most of the drawings are made in Inkscape and then imported, the commutative diagrams are made with tikzcd and finally some Asymptote is present. Here are some pages of them:

pic1

pic2

pic3

They definitely are not top-tier but I still am quite satisfied with the result.

4
  • So nice design. Would you like to share the template? My e-mail is mauramz at gmail.com Thank you.
    – Mauramz
    Nov 17, 2019 at 3:36
  • 3
    I am not too sure how to share a template or how to even create one. I put together the relevant commands for the sections and the theorems and put them here. Alongside these I also use some other commands to manage my figures but they are not really relevant with the design you see here. As for the document class I use \documentclass[symmetric,nobib,notoc, a4paper]{tufte-book}. I hope this suffices!
    – gjkf
    Nov 17, 2019 at 10:59
  • @gjkf Kindly share this template with me: jongaro at ictp.it
    – Gauss
    Aug 17, 2020 at 20:35
  • pastebin.com/7bzqaXPf This is the common preamble I used, the document class is right above. The preamble it's all but well done, hope it helps though!
    – gjkf
    Aug 17, 2020 at 20:39
10

I used to make my own documentclass for my master's degree. It is not perfect, but I feel confortable with it. It is still in progress. I would probably add a GitHub repository this summer for sharing it.

There's 2 main classes:

The MasterNotes class:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

The MasterArticle class: (only the title changes)

enter image description here

The MasterLessons class: (a variant of MasterArticle for my preparation for Agrégation oral exam)

enter image description here

EDIT The code is now available on GitHub here. I will no longer support it. I have another project instead.

3
  • This looks beautiful! Is there any chance one can get the source code of your MasterNotes class with some dummy text?
    – Ele
    Aug 23, 2022 at 19:56
  • I will create a Github Repo. for this class, maybe the next week. It is no longer supported though. I will edit the post once done.
    – Strumff.
    Aug 27, 2022 at 15:24
  • Link to the GitHub added.
    – Strumff.
    Aug 27, 2022 at 21:24
10

I would like to present my humble example here: Kochański's Approximation published in Acta Eruditorum 1685.

https://danieldelimata.github.io/kochanski/

enter image description here

1
  • Done in TeX? Note that 1685 is too early even for WordStar and Electric Pencil... :) (nice, anyway).
    – Fran
    Feb 28 at 10:24
8

This is a preprint of an article I am working on, which makes use of the wonderful (but sadly defunct) tufte-latex and its tufte-handout class, together with the pgfpages package. It's rather simplistic, but given the few modifications made, the result is quite nice and clean. Just wanted to post this an example of what can be achieved without being a LaTeX templating guru, but still looks distinguishably different from the standard templates, thanks to the great work of others.

The article is available on github if anyone wants to dive into the code.

First page Second page Third page

4
  • I am not fond of Tufte's use of margin figures. The reader may find it difficult to know in what order to read the material. I prefer to put the illustrations into the flow of the text as much as possible. Your example doesn't suffer from this problem, but most people who follow Tufte have that problem. Jan 31, 2019 at 20:29
  • @BenjaminMcKay: how does that differ from standard LaTeX's floats, though? If the figure is labeled Figure n, and you refer to it as such in the text, I fail to see the problem. The output looks absolutely beautiful, but I wonder if the lines are on grid.
    – morbusg
    Jan 31, 2019 at 22:37
  • I edited the post and added a link to the github page where the code for the article can be found. Feb 1, 2019 at 1:58
  • @morbusg: I agree; LaTeX's floats give a similar problem, but Tufte's style encourages large numbers of margin figures. Large numbers of floats would have the same problem, but people usually don't have very many floats. Feb 1, 2019 at 11:45
8

I am a member of the National University of Singapore Astronomical Society, and we hold competitions for secondary and pre-university students. I typeset the exam papers for this year's iteration. The preamble is admittedly extremely messy, with plenty of possibly unnecessary code, but the product looks good. The exam class was used to great effect.

Nearly every single diagram was hand-coded in separate .tikz files, compiled and imported in; I am especially pleased with the diagrams for the bielliptical transfer and orbital parameters: enter image description here

enter image description here

3
  • Last year, during University Physics Competition, I was trying to draw some Hoffman transfer orbit diagrams. But due to lack of time and proficiency, I ended up using Geogebra to draw them. Do you mind showing the tikz codes of the diagrams?
    – raf
    May 22, 2021 at 13:25
  • 1
    @raf, please find a pastebin of the code here. It is meant to be used with this preamble: please comment out the Minion Pro and MnSymbol packages for compatibility. It is not the best code, and I would like to change much of it (like optimising the radii of the orbits), but this is how I set up the images when I typeset them two years ago.
    – SRSR333
    May 22, 2021 at 13:49
  • Thanks for sharing, @SRSR333
    – raf
    May 23, 2021 at 8:04
8

Is this the shameless plug place? Ok then! Here's my PhD thesis which, 4+ years later, I am still happy with the way it turned out. Style is available here. It's an amalgamation of different things I got off the interwebs and tweaked when procrastinating.

5
  • would you please give us a template or part of the code you used in your Thesis. I looks really nice.
    – Mauramz
    Feb 12, 2015 at 18:45
  • 1
    Overall is a nice design, but I think you have been too brave using illuminated capitals at start of chapters in a computer science thesis! I beat that this was a bit controversial with your advisor ;)
    – TeXtnik
    Feb 13, 2015 at 11:44
  • 1
    @zunbeltz Not really. Even the examiners were pretty pleased with it aesthetically (as well as content wise!).
    – Yehia
    Feb 13, 2015 at 14:14
  • @Yehia Good for you! Maybe I will try to use them in my tech reports ;)
    – TeXtnik
    Feb 13, 2015 at 20:15
  • 1
7

Not a big one, but it illustrates how easy it can be to integrate various styles of music with LaTeX (source on GitHub):

7

Tom Lehrer has put his songs in the public domain. I have typeset a book from his lyrics (and actually orderd a printed copy).

The book is based on the memoir class and the font is a Palatino clone provided by the New PX font package. Everything is set on a grid.

The full pdf and the LaTeX source code is available online.

The Elements by Tom Lehrer

Tom Lehrer – Songs and Lyrics

6

Philip A. Ebert and Marcus Rossberg's translation of Frege's Grundgesetze der Arithmetik features some of the most complex notation devised. The TeX source is not available, but one can view much of the work on the "preview" link at the OUP page for the book.

Edited by Ben McKay: Here is a little sample (which won't give us copyright problems, as it is fair use): enter image description here

3
  • Could you please add an image?
    – user156344
    Dec 4, 2018 at 16:43
  • I have included a link for the interested reader, copying an image from there might have copyright implication, so I have not done so.
    – J.J. Green
    Dec 4, 2018 at 16:58
  • 2
    I think one or two pages would probably be fine? Those proof trees seem fancy. Jan 15, 2019 at 9:25
6

After finally managing to read Bringhurst's The Elements of Typographic Style this past weekend, I felt the urge to try out a few new fonts. This was one of the byproducts … The font is Cochineal, the drop cap comes from some CD they had at the office. Full code below.

enter image description here

\documentclass[12pt]{article}

\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage[portrait,a5paper,hmargin=2.5cm,vmargin=4cm]{geometry}
\usepackage[babel,activate={true,nocompatibility},protrusion=true,expansion=true,tracking=true,factor=750,stretch=5,shrink=5]{microtype}
\usepackage{fontspec}
    \defaultfontfeatures{SmallCapsFeatures = {
        Letters = SmallCaps,
        LetterSpace = 2.25,
        Numbers = Lining}}

    \setmainfont{Cochineal}[Numbers={Proportional,OldStyle}]
    \providefontfamily\dropcaps{TypographerWoodcut01.ttf}

\usepackage{xcolor}
\usepackage{pagecolor}
    \definecolor{MyCrimson}{HTML}{880000}
    \definecolor{MyGrey}{HTML}{080808}
    \definecolor{MyBackground}{HTML}{FFFFEB}
    \pagecolor{MyBackground}

\usepackage{lettrine}
\renewcommand{\LettrineFontHook}{\dropcaps}

\pagestyle{empty}

\begin{document}
    \begin{quote}
        \begin{flushright}
            \itshape\large\textcolor{MyCrimson}
            {{\LARGE Everything~}{\Large written symbols can say has already passed \rlap{by\,…}}}
        \end{flushright}
    \end{quote}

    \lettrine[lines=4,findent=.25em,nindent=0em,lhang=.04,loversize=-.01]
    {\textcolor{MyCrimson}{T}}{\textcolor{MyGrey}{\kern .25pt hey are like tracks left by
    animals.} }\\[2pt]{\textcolor{MyGrey}{That is why the masters of
    meditation re\-fuse to accept that writings are final. The aim is to reach
    true being by means of those tracks, those letters, those signs; but
    reality itself is not a sign, and it leaves no tracks. It doesn't come to
    us by way of letters or words. We can go toward it, by following those
    words and letters back to whence they came from.}

\vspace{1ex}

    \noindent {\textcolor{MyGrey}{ But so long as we are preoccupied with symbols, theories and opinions, we will fail to reach the principle.}

\vspace{1ex}

    \noindent{}\kern .5pt—~But when we give up symbols and opinions, aren't we left in the utter nothingness of being?

\vspace{-3.5ex}

    \begin{quote}
        \hfill\itshape\large\textcolor{MyCrimson}{\noindent{}\kern .5pt—~Yes.}
    \end{quote}

\vspace{2\baselineskip}

    \begin{flushleft}
        {\textcolor{MyGrey}{
        \small
        \noindent\textsc{Kimura Kyūho} — \emph{Kenjutsu Fushigi Hen} \newline
        [On the Mysteries of Swordsmanship], 1768}}
    \end{flushleft}
\end{document}
6

The book Engineering Design Optimization by Martins and Ning is a perfect example of beautiful typesetting.

enter image description here

2
  • +1: Can you please add some kind of explanation why you think that the book is created with LaTeX? Aug 31, 2022 at 3:35
  • 1
    I admit I have no proof that created with LaTeX. However, the layout seems to be tufte-latex and the plots all look as created with pgfplots. The \intercal symbol for the transpose in the image, etc. Aug 31, 2022 at 6:34
5

At the first reduction of the Gaussian elimination using the Gauss transform, the resulting matrix will have 0 below the first entry in the first column, the first row will not change and the trailing matrix will be updated accordingly. A clear way to see this is to visualize the process in a block-portioned matrix. I wrote a code that demonstrates this providing beautiful visualization. The code is really big but if you wish to have the code just "@me" in the comments of any of my questions/answers and I will provide you with the link to the code. Enjoy!!! enter image description here

5

Not much by way of typography (it's URW Classico for sans-serif and Baskervaldx for serif), but I hope you find the book that I'm writing worth of this thread. (Latest version here: http://bit.ly/2JuJxTJ)

It relies on a heavy use of tcolorbox for definitions, exercises, examples, and end-of-chapter projects.

Book cover: cover Table of contents: table of contents Beginning of chapter: beginning of chapter Exercise and definition: exercise and definition Table: table End-of-chapter project: end of chapter project End-of-chapter summary: end of chapter summary

I still have some issues to solve, as seen in the second of these "example" boxes:

example boxes

But by and large, I hope that the use of the different kinds of boxes makes the different kinds of contents easier to localize, as well as making the flow of the text somewhat less... tedious?

4
  • Tables with vertical rules and "ejemplo 50" without the 0 are not examples of beautiful typography, sorry.
    – CarLaTeX
    May 8, 2022 at 5:34
  • @CarLaTeX I disagree about the vertical rules, but agree about "ejemplo 50". As I said, I still don't know how to fix the latter. May 8, 2022 at 5:45
  • Search for /tcb/height=⟨length⟩ in the tcolorbox documentation, it sets a minimum box height. (Professional tables don't have vertical rules).
    – CarLaTeX
    May 8, 2022 at 5:51
  • 1
    @CarlosRomero is it possible please to share the source Tex file? thanks in advance.
    – Bilal
    Jun 4, 2022 at 19:51

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