1

I'm trying to use the \underbrace option, and I kind of managed to make it work with the following code:

\begin{equation}
\begin{array}{rcl}
\left(\Lambda_1 \Lambda_2\right)^T G \left(\Lambda_1 \Lambda_2\right) =   &  \Lambda_2^T \underbrace{\Lambda_1^T G \Lambda_1} \Lambda_2 & = \Lambda_2^T G \Lambda_2 = G \\ 
 & = G & {}
\end{array} 
\end{equation}

However, I'm not really happy about the spacing between the different signs of the cells, because it is not how my other "normal" equations look like:

enter image description here

Does anybody know how I can make this look better?

1 Answer 1

4

In this particular instance, you don't need an array since it messes with the vertical alignment of your equation number. Instead, use \underbrace the way it's intended to be used:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
\begin{equation}
  \begin{array}{rcl}
    \left(\Lambda_1 \Lambda_2\right)^T G \left(\Lambda_1 \Lambda_2\right) =  &  \Lambda_2^T \underbrace{\Lambda_1^T G \Lambda_1} \Lambda_2 & = \Lambda_2^T G \Lambda_2 = G \\ 
      & = G & {}
  \end{array} 
\end{equation}

\begin{equation}
  (\Lambda_1 \Lambda_2)^T G (\Lambda_1 \Lambda_2) = \Lambda_2^T \underbrace{\Lambda_1^T G \Lambda_1}_{{}=G} \Lambda_2 = \Lambda_2^T G \Lambda_2 = G
\end{equation}

\end{document}

If you wish to have a larger script in the \underbrace, use \textstyle.

If you must have some form of alignment, you could use a r@{}c@{}l column specification in your array and supplement the equations with surrounding empty groups {} to achieve proper spacing.

2
  • That is perfect, thank you! Instead of textstyle, I've used displaystyle. Also, in what scenario is it better to use an array?
    – Hunter
    Sep 12, 2013 at 7:38
  • 1
    @Hunter: Whenever you want a specific horizontal alignment and stack stuff.
    – Werner
    Sep 12, 2013 at 14:25

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .