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I need to use a style file that does not allow use of natbib, but I still want to use something similar to the \citeauthor or \citet command from natbib. This similar to this question, but that answer references use of natbib. I've also tried using biblatex, but the results were not close enough to the abbrv style that I need to use for BibTeX. Does anyone know a way around this?

Edit: the bibliography style isn't the issue. The stylefile doesn't allow using natbib.

Edit: Another restriction is I have to eventually make a self contained file. The recommendation is copy the .bbl in to where the bibliography section was, but I was unable to get a procedure like that to work with biblatex.

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  • If you tried biblatex, have a look at tex.stackexchange.com/questions/58152/…
    – lockstep
    Sep 30, 2013 at 21:48
  • You mention you're currently using the bibliography style abbrv. Have you considered using the style abbrvnat -- which would be compatible with natbib?
    – Mico
    Sep 30, 2013 at 21:51
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    If the class you're using doesn't allow for natbib, probably the people you want to submit your paper to don't want an author-year citation scheme. Emulating what natbib does would mean rewrite it.
    – egreg
    Sep 30, 2013 at 22:52
  • @egreg One might want to have something like: Goldberg [10] showed etc. Aug 8, 2016 at 11:34

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Given that the style you need to use disallows using natbib, the conclusion is that the organization you'll submit your paper to doesn't accept an author-year citation scheme. Most likely also biblatex would be rejected.

Emulating the working of natbib would mean rewriting it from scratch.

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    One might want to have something like: Goldberg [10] showed etc. Aug 8, 2016 at 11:34
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    @AlwaysLearning I understand, but this would require very extensive work under the risk of rejection.
    – egreg
    Aug 8, 2016 at 13:04

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