3

I took a screenshot an then saved as EPS using photoshop. This EPS looks well as it's original source. I use the following code to insert the image:

\begin{figure}[H]\begin{center}
 \centering
  \captionsetup{justification=centering}
  \includegraphics[width=1\textwidth]{pictures/proposal/aaaida_use_case}
  \caption{lorem ipsum \label{fig:network-architecture}}
\end{center}\end{figure}

When I compile the tex to dvi, then ps and finally pdf, the resulting image included in the document has a very poor quality, like a JPEG when you save it several times (recompression with quality loss)

Instead of this, if I compile directly to dvi and then pdf it shows nice.

And if instead of saving to EPS I save the image to PDF, using PDFLatex also looks fine.

So I don't understand why the PS step is loosing quality (image recompression).

Finally I don't understand pretty well the differences between DVI->PS->PDF and DVI->PDF on terms of the resulting document.

Many thanks in advance!

5
  • Why do you need EPS while you can save your screenshot in PNG which can be imported by pdflatex? Nov 2, 2013 at 18:25
  • I use a template created by my university, which uses several EPS files in order to add the logos and different pictures. Using pdflatex fails with that EPS images, I found that pdflatex don't work with EPS.
    – Gerard
    Nov 2, 2013 at 18:34
  • But you can convert your existing EPS to PDF first and then use pdflatex. Nov 2, 2013 at 18:48
  • Ok, that's true! On the other side, I will need to include vector images, exporting to PDF will be OK then? Thank you!
    – Gerard
    Nov 2, 2013 at 19:02
  • I think graphicx package will convert EPS to PDF automatically if you use pdflatex. Try it if you don't know. :-) Nov 2, 2013 at 19:11

1 Answer 1

4

For the PS -> PDF step you can use ps2pdf with options to suppress resampling and lossily compressing images -dAutoFilterColorImages=false and -dColorImageFilter=/FlateEncode. (On windows, you may have to replace the = by #).

1
  • Thanks! I'm finally using pdflatex directly, but it's interesting to have the answer here. Thanks!
    – Gerard
    Nov 4, 2013 at 20:35

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