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I am compiling the references for a technical report, using biblatex to manage my citations and I require a annotated bibliography style.

When I compiled the first draft of this report I used bibtex with the plain-annote bibliography style. I was not happy with this implementation because of two reasons; the IEEE citation style was not well represented which is critical for my needs, and the order in which the citations occurred was not appropriate, and sorting these is not a simple task with bibtex.

I currently use biblatex with all of my assignments with style=ieee, because it produces an output which follows the IEEE citation style which is required, and it is very easy to work with.

Using biblatex the only thing I require is the addition of the annote field with the IEEE style. I have read through the biblatex documentation and the reading style is the only one I have found that will display my annotations, but its general style is not desired.

Am I missing something as far as adding the annote field to an IEEE styled reference with biblatex?

  • Welcome to TeX.SX! You can have a look at our starter guide to familiarize yourself further with our format. – Sean Allred Nov 24 '13 at 22:23
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To put you annotation at the end of each reference you can redefine the finentry bib macro.

\renewbibmacro{finentry}{\finentry%
   \iffieldundef{annotation}
      {}
      {\par\medskip\printfield{annotation}\finentry}}

Notice that, in the redefinition you have to use annotation and not annote. In biblatex annote is an alias for annotation but annotation has to be used in the various biblatex definitions.

To insert space between the entry for the reference and the text for the annotation, one can use any (vertical) space command (\medskip in the code above). The \iffieldundefined guards against references without annotation.

  • Thank you, this accomplishes what I am looking to do! Would it be possible to have the annotation indented and separated from the rest of the citation? There is almost no vertical distance between the two. – Eric Nov 25 '13 at 1:25

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