11

The symbol I'm looking for appears in maths when the closure of an open set is contained in a bigger set; it's like two \subset, but doesn't look like \Subset. It's similar to \ll. How can I typeset that symbol?

Some code showing the different symbols discussed above:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amssymb}

\begin{document}
\ttfamily
\begin{tabular}{ll}
\string\subset  & $\subset$ \\
\string\Subset  & $\Subset$ \\
\string\ll          & $\ll$ \\
\end{tabular}
\end{document}

enter image description here

0

2 Answers 2

12

I've seen the notation used in Rudin's book “Real and complex analysis”. Perhaps, simply doubling \subset is too crude. Here's a possible solution, top line is \subset\subset, bottom line \ssubset defined with some backspace between the two.

\documentclass{article}
\newcommand{\ssubset}{\subset\joinrel\subset}

\begin{document}
$A\subset\subset B$

$A\ssubset B$
\end{document}

enter image description here

6

If you want to be quite similar to \ll, then you can use this symbol, which overlaps the two \subsets. It should work properly in all sizes:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{mathtools}

\newcommand\ssubset{
  \mathrel{
    \mathrlap{\subset}
    \hphantom{\ll}
    \mathllap{\subset}
  }
}

\begin{document}

\[
  A\ssubset B_{A\ssubset B_{A\ssubset B}}
\]

\end{document}

In the above code I wrote it on several lines to show a bit what's going on. The one-liner works as well of course:

\newcommand\ssubset{\mathrel{\mathrlap{\subset}\hphantom{\ll}\mathllap{\subset}}}

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .