1
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\usepackage{lipsum}
\setmainfont{Palatino Linotype}
\begin{document}

\lipsum[1]
\includegraphics[scale=0.7]{EIGHT}
\end{document}

I'm using xelatex (cf. my minimal code example)

I would like to know how to convert my image in bitmap rather than having a lot of gradation? Is it possible to do so with xelatex?

enter image description here

enter image description here

I would like to convert the image like something close to the second part part of the image (like some uniform pixels) :

enter image description here

  • 3
    The image you show should almost certainly not be in png (or any bitmap) format. It should be prepared in a scalable format (e.g., eps, pdf, svg) so that it can be zoomed in without loss of quality (like the first A in your last image). If, for any reason, it must be in a bitmap format like png, one usually asks the program that creates the image to use or (not use) anti-aliasing on the fonts. Your close-up of "du gra" shows characters that have had antialiasing applied. This looks smoother at low magnification. The second A in your last image has not had antialiasing applied. – Dan Dec 4 '13 at 18:20
  • The problem is, you're providing xelatex w/ an anti-aliased pixel image --- if you convert it to a posterized file w/ few enough colours in it you'll have a very jagged image. The best thing to do is to re-create the chart using some tool which will make a press-ready, vector .pdf – WillAdams Dec 4 '13 at 19:53
  • OK it's clear thanks both of you for your help – S12000 Dec 4 '13 at 23:02
  • @Dan Could you make that an answer? – Joseph Wright Jan 11 '14 at 9:05
2

The image you show should almost certainly not be in png (or any bitmap) format. It should be prepared in a scalable format (e.g., eps, pdf, svg) so that it can be zoomed in without loss of quality (like the first A in your last image). If, for any reason, it must be in a bitmap format like png, one usually asks the program that creates the image to use or (not use) anti-aliasing on the fonts. Your close-up of "du gra" shows characters that have had antialiasing applied (border pixels are grayed). This looks smoother at low magnification. The second A in your last image has not had antialiasing applied.

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