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I am importing a number of .png files into my document as follows:

\usepackage{wrapfig}
    \begin{wrapfigure}{r}{0.5\textwidth}
    \centering
    \vspace{-1.5cm}
    \scalebox{0.5}{\includegraphics{./X.png}}
    \caption{Mycaption.}
    \label{mylabel}
    \end{wrapfigure}

Now, my figures are rather small, as ypu can see I scale them down quite a bit. Still, after adding a few of these figures my document gets rather large (seemingly increasing by just a bit more than the sizes of the figures).

I suspect latex adds them with their full DPI, instead of remapping them to the DPI of the document (thus keeping extra detail).

I havve 2 questions:

  • How can I check whether it is so?
  • Supposing it were so, what can I do to stop my document from getting so very very huge?
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    The first part is easy: TeX just imports images 'as is' (in any case, there is no 'DPI of the document'). To rescale them you need an external tool: which OS are you using? – Joseph Wright Dec 5 '13 at 7:00
  • Gentoo linux. Doesn't texlive provide any packae which rescales the image to the document dpi at compile time? – TheChymera Dec 5 '13 at 8:58
  • @TheChymera: THERE IS NO DOCUMENT DPI. – Martin Schröder Dec 5 '13 at 13:24
  • oh, so I literally have to manually (or batch) rescale them? can't I set a dpi to which latex should rescale all figures? – TheChymera Dec 5 '13 at 21:37
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To sum up the comments: TeX doesn't have any concept of a 'document DPI' as it fundamentally does not make sense. DPI in print depend on the output device but that should only have an effect during the actual output. Thus if you want to fiddle with images you have to pre-process with a suitable third-party tool.

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