1

Could somebody tell me why the following code, after wrapping the figure in text, keeps the following text padded left and no longer formatted as normal?

 \begin{document}
\section{Description of Equipment}
    The equipment used in this experiment consisted of a control volume with a nozzle connected to the mains penetrating through the bottom of the said volume and a pivoting lever arm connected to a vane or hemispherical-cup. A valve was fitted to the nozzle line allowing the flow rate to be set arbitrarily. 
    \begin{wrapfigure}{r}{0.5\textwidth}
      \begin{center}
        \includegraphics[width=0.5\textwidth]{Jet}
      \end{center}
      \caption{Set Up}
    \end{wrapfigure}
    The nozzle was directed at either a flat or cupped plate which was connected to the pivoting lever arm. On top of this lever arm a jockey mass was able to be positioned at various distances from the fulcrum, thus increasing or decreasing the moment which opposed the induced fluid jet moment. This description is perfectly complimented by figure 1, which can be seen to the right hand side. A weigh tank was once again used in the measurement of $Q$. The utilisation of this equipment will be discussed later.

    \section{Procedure}
    \begin{itemize}
    \item The apparatus is set up as shown in figure 1. 
    \item The flow rate is set by varying the degree of how open the in-line valve is. This flow can then be measures using the weigh tank.
    \item A 7.5 kg mass is attached to the weigh tank and the time taken for the equivalent mass of water to balance this mass is measured. This gives you the mass flow rate and subsequently the volumetric flow rate can be found by dividing by $\rho_{water}$.
    \end{itemize}

     \end{document}

\documentclass[11pt]{article}
\usepackage[top = 1in, bottom = 1in, right = 1in, left = 1in]{geometry}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{siunitx}
\usepackage{booktabs}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{float}
\usepackage[parfill]{parskip}
\usepackage{xfrac}
\usepackage{wrapfig}

\section{Description of Equipment}
    The equipment used in this experiment consisted of a control volume with a nozzle connected to the mains penetrating through the bottom of the said volume and a pivoting lever arm connected to a vane or hemispherical-cup. A valve was fitted to the nozzle line allowing the flow rate to be set arbitrarily. 
    \begin{wrapfigure}{r}{0.5\textwidth}
      \begin{center}
        \vspace{1cm}
      \end{center}
      \caption{Set Up}
    \end{wrapfigure}
    The nozzle was directed at either a flat or cupped plate which was connected to the pivoting lever arm. On top of this lever arm a jockey mass was able to be positioned at various distances from the fulcrum, thus increasing or decreasing the moment which opposed the induced fluid jet moment. This description is perfectly complimented by figure 1, which can be seen to the right hand side. A weigh tank was once again used in the measurement of $Q$. The utilisation of this equipment will be discussed later.

    \section{Procedure}
    \begin{itemize}
    \item The apparatus is set up as shown in figure 1. 
    \item The flow rate is set by varying the degree of how open the in-line valve is. This flow can then be measures using the weigh tank.
    \item A 7.5 kg mass is attached to the weigh tank and the time taken for the equivalent mass of water to balance this mass is measured. This gives you the mass flow rate and subsequently the volumetric flow rate can be found by dividing by $\rho_{water}$.
    \end{itemize}

     \end{document}
  • 1
    please add \documentclass and any other commands required to process the example. also replace the includegraphics by \vspace{1cm} or whatever so no extra image files needed. – David Carlisle Dec 6 '13 at 22:38
  • Just did it there. – David O'Sullivan Dec 6 '13 at 22:46
  • 1
    Sorry I meant you should edit the question to have an example that generates the problem. the answer below is missing a \begin{document} so generates an error but doesn't appear to have any problem with the alignment? – David Carlisle Dec 6 '13 at 23:33
  • Also, please make the example minimal next time. – Svend Tveskæg Dec 7 '13 at 18:22
  • Sorry about that. – David O'Sullivan Dec 7 '13 at 18:42
5

Your figure might be too tall. When that happens, the narrow lines propagate to the next paragraph. However, it is documented that wrapfigures have bad interaction with lists and what appears to happen is all the items in the list have the wrong margin.

You can do two things to remedy that. One is to make the figure not so tall. You could remove the center environment. It adds space and makes the figure contents taller than necessary. Instead, use \centering. This will make the figure not so tall.

You could also perhaps scale the figure down a bit.

The second possibility is to move some of the text before the figure down below the wrapfigure environment.

When I tried yor example with a locally available figure, I got the effect you describe. Removing the center environment cured the problem for me, but it would depend on the actual height of your figure (mine was 4.6cm). Moving two line from before the wrafigure environment to after it also worked, but that, too, would depend on your figure's size.

\begin{wrapfigure}{r}{0.5\textwidth}
  \centering
    \includegraphics[width=0.5\textwidth]{Jet}
  \caption{Set Up}
\end{wrapfigure} 
  • It must be my figure. I sorted it by setting the amount of lines to wrap using wrapfigure[]{}. – David O'Sullivan Dec 7 '13 at 18:42

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