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In two of my documents, WriteLatex tells me the following after typesetting:

(no line number):
writeLaTeX Warning: I ran pdflatex more than 5
times, but it still looks like more runs are required; it may
be that something is jumping between pages.

My documents are quite dissimilar; both use different templates, and one is more image heavy than the other. Both however span about 8 pages and print their Bibtex references at the end. That last property probably explains the repeated running of pdflatex server side.

Either way, both documents look fine and show no other warnings. This warning annoys the heck out of me however. What does it mean, and how do I fix it?

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  • Most likely you have references at the first or last lines of a paragraph at the top or bottom of a page and LaTeX really has a hard time deciding where to put the line, and gets confused. You'll just have to check visually. Jan 6, 2014 at 16:47
  • Are your references correct? Perhaps add the hyperref package and see if your hyperlinks are accurate.
    – Werner
    Jan 6, 2014 at 17:11
  • It is possible to produce documents that take more than 5 runs to stabilise (or in fact that never stabilise) If writelatex does not let you use more than 5 runs you may need to run latex locally in the former case (or in the latter case you need to add a forced page break) Jan 6, 2014 at 17:13

1 Answer 1

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I'm a cofounder at writeLaTeX.

That warning was probably due to a bug in our build script --- i.e. it was my fault! We've now fixed the issue, so if you make a change to your document and recompile, it should go away. If not, you can send us the link to your document via our contact form, and we'll have a look. Sorry for the confusion.

As the comments on your question point out, there are some reasons that more than five runs may be required, but in my experience it is quite rare. If that case does arise, we can easily increase the limit for you.

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  • The error's gone. Thanks for your quick bug fixing, awesome! :)
    – DCKing
    Jan 9, 2014 at 16:22

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