2

So I'm trying to type up my math homework and I'm wondering how to number the problems (NOT THE EQUATIONS!). So I has to be like

4.3 
//work
4.4
//work
5.2
//work
6.1
//work

Does anyone know how to do that?

  • What does each number represent? Do you want automatic or manual numbering? What other formatting are you trying to achieve? There will be some heading, such as "Problem" before the numbers? – Gonzalo Medina Jan 24 '14 at 1:58
  • Your numbers are in order, but with no other visible pattern. If this is what you need, you should just type the number of each problem for which you show work. If this doesn't answer your question you will have to make the question clearer. – Ethan Bolker Jan 24 '14 at 1:59
  • @EthanBolker so the homework assignment is do problems: 4.3, 4.4, 5.2, 6.1. WHAT the numbers mean is unimportant, but if you must know the first number is the section number and the number after the decimal is the problem number in the section. – Richard Jan 24 '14 at 2:01
  • It's possible the OP wants the numbers and content to be typeset as a numbered list, but with arbitrary question numbers in place of the regular number labels? The question as posed doesn't indicate that, but it's what I can imagine wanting in that scenario. Werner's solution can look a bit odd when questions don't have text titles but only numbers. – dbmag9 Jan 24 '14 at 2:03
7

You can just use a \section* and number them according to your requirements manually:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
\section*{4.3 Some stuff}
// work
\section*{4.4 Another section}
// work
\section*{5.2 Interesting stuff}
// work
\section*{6.1 Final section}
// work
\end{document}
3

If you prefer to format them as a standard enumerated list but with arbitrary numbering, you might want something like this:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumitem}
\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}[widest={5.2}]
  \item[4.3] Some problem\\
  // work
  \item[4.4] Another question\\
  // work
  \item[5.2] Interesting solution\\
  // work
  \item[6.1] Final proof\\
  // work
\end{enumerate}
\end{document}

Using enumitem with widest={5.2} allows you to specify the appropriate label width. That probably wouldn't make an enormous difference here but it might otherwise cause problems if your problems had more convoluted numbering.

enumeration with arbitrary numbering

  • Check out the documentation, enumitem's enumerate can do all sorts of fancy formatting of the number (and number items for you). – vonbrand Jan 24 '14 at 13:35
  • @vonbrand enumitem is indeed very flexible and powerful. I don't think it could number the items for you in this case, however, since its powers do not yet extend to reading the mind of your maths teacher! – cfr Jan 24 '14 at 15:35

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