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This question already has an answer here:

I have prepared a scientific manuscript for a Springer journal in LaTeX (The Springer template defines "svjour3" document class). After a review process, the editor ask me to change some parts of the paper and submit again for the second review process. In Microsoft Word, revising is defined as "track change". This feature highlights the changes within the document. I just want to know if LaTeX has a similar feature like track change in MS Word?

If not, what's the best way to highlight changes in a LaTeX document?

marked as duplicate by StrongBad, egreg, Peter Jansson, moewe, Jesse Feb 9 '14 at 12:42

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One thing to look at is latexdiff. Here's the description from CTAN:

La­texd­iff is a Perl script for vi­sual mark up and re­vi­sion of sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ences be­tween two la­tex files. Var­i­ous op­tions are avail­able for vi­sual markup us­ing stan­dard la­tex pack­ages such as color. Changes not di­rectly af­fect­ing vis­i­ble text, for ex­am­ple in for­mat­ting com­mands, are still marked in the la­tex source. A rudi­men­tary re­vi­sion fa­cilil­ity is pro­vided by an­other Perl script, la­texre­vise, which ac­cepts or re­jects all changes. Man­ual edit­ing of the dif­fer­ence file can be used to over­ride this de­fault be­haviour and ac­cept or re­ject se­lected changes only.