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Greetings to all TeX lovers!

I have been reading Xenophon's "Cyrus' Anabasis" these days in my free time. The book is from the Loeb Classical Harvard Library.

Usually I use Garamond to write my papers or other work in English and the standard Didot for Greek (Gulliver is also good for Latin script, but you need to purchase it). Yet, I would say that I prefer the glyphs from LCL. In the book it says that they use ZephGreek and ZephText.

I was wondering if there is a close substitute for TeX.

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  • It's not clear to me what you mean by "a close substitute for TeX". TeX, at its core, is a typesetting "engine". Did you maybe mean to write "a close substitute for Computer Modern fonts"? Please advise. – Mico Mar 2 '14 at 16:08
  • @MIco what I meant is if there is a way to produce exactly the same result as ZephGreek or something close by loading a specific font in LaTeX. – Pantelis Kazakis Mar 2 '14 at 16:10
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    It is based on 'Porson' Greek according to the information at hup.harvard.edu/features/loeb/logo-type.html. But the Zeph* fonts themselves seem to be custom commissions for HUP for use in Loeb books. So I doubt you will find anything to give you identical results. If others have found the fonts attractive, you might find something inspired by them but I suspect that's going to be the closest you'll get. gfsporson might be your best bet for Greek since that's also based on 'Porson'. There is also web.archive.org/web/20071028001414/http://www.geocities.com/…. – cfr Mar 2 '14 at 16:26
  • @Pantelis Kazakis: a little aside, but since you use Garamond for English, did you take a look at EBGaramond, an opentype free font that's available on CTAN and has characters for monotonic and polytonic Greek? – Bernard Mar 2 '14 at 23:33
  • @Bernard, I really appreciate this information. I usually use garamondx in Linux. I now happen to realise, after testing, that when I installed garamondx, I have also installed EBGaramond, which works like a charm with Greek. Yet I gotta admit that ZephGreek is more beautiful and elegant. – Pantelis Kazakis Mar 3 '14 at 2:38
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The Zeph fonts are based on 'Porson' Greek according to the information provided by Harvard University Press. But the Zeph* fonts themselves seem to be custom commissions for HUP for use in Loeb books. So I doubt you will find anything to give you identical results. If others have found the fonts attractive, you might find something inspired by them but I suspect that's going to be the closest you'll get.

For Greek, the Greek Font Society (GFS) provides a font based on 'Porson' which might be your best bet. The Greek Font Foundry offers an alternative.

GFS Porson is fully supported for use with TeX. A package is available from CTAN which provides both fonts and LaTeX support. The package is included in both MiKTeX and TeX Live as gfsporson. Reading the documentation, you might try something like this:

\documentclass[greek,british]{article}
\usepackage{babel}
\usepackage{gfsdidot,texnames}
\usepackage{gfsporson}
\newcommand{\greek}[1]{\foreignlanguage{greek}{\textporson{#1}}}
\begin{document}
The heights of the letters in the \LaTeX{} package supporting GFS Porson are adjusted to match the Latin fonts from GFS Didot.

Latin and \greek{dokim'h}.

\end{document}

GFS Porson Greek with GFS Didot Latin

I've used GFS Didot for Latin since the heights of Porson's Greek are set up to match the Latin script from Didot but obviously you could match Porson with a different Latin script if preferred. Like gfsporson, gfsdidot is available from CTAN and included in both MiKTeX and TeX Live.

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  • @cfr, I use Didot Modern from the Greek Font Society already. – Pantelis Kazakis Mar 3 '14 at 2:40
  • @PantelisKazakis I know. But (1) my answer is intended to help other users of the site and therefore needs to be complete, and (2) you mentioned using it only for Greek whereas I am suggesting using it only for Latin and using something else for Greek ;). Of course, you could use a different font but since the size is adjusted to match Porson, I thought Didot the best option for demonstration purposes. – cfr Mar 15 '14 at 2:03
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On this site, you can read it was inspired by PorsonGreek. And the Greek Font Society created GFSPorson, available for use with LaTeX and XeLaTeX (exists in type 1 and open type formats) on CTAN. It's included with 7 other greek fonts in TeXLive as well as MiKTeX.

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  • As I said in my comment an hour earlier, in fact. The trouble is that this will not provide a substitute for ZephText even though, as I noted, it is probably the closest the OP will get as a substitute for ZephGreek. – cfr Mar 2 '14 at 22:11
  • Oh! Sorry, I didn't see it. Probably you hadn't commented yet when I saw the question, then I checked what I meant to answer, doing several other things and posted without verifying if there was some new answer/comment. How can I add you to my answer? – Bernard Mar 2 '14 at 22:45
  • On Harvard's site I mentioned in my answer, it seems pretty clear this font is not even on sale ("exclusive property of Harvard University Press"). – Bernard Mar 2 '14 at 22:48
  • It's fine, really. I've done the same thing. Don't worry about it. I've also now turned my comment into an answer having read gfsporson's documentation to figure out the suggested match in terms of Latin script. I agree about the font. I don't think buying it is an option. They had it designed specifically for this series of books. While they say everyone has their price I doubt any of us would want to pay it... – cfr Mar 2 '14 at 22:51

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