1

I want to have an output like this

enter image description here

The closest I have come is with code ${A^{\leftarrow}}_(x, y, z + n)$ that gives me something like

enter image description here

where the subscript is way of the mark. Trying something like this $A^{\leftarrow}_(x, y, z + n)$ gives even a greater distortion like this

enter image description here.

I have tried using \displaystyle but not sure how to get the syntax correctly, to make it happen. Display style seems to work with things like limits or sums, and I am not sure how I could bend them to my needs. Any leads would be helpful.

1 Answer 1

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Enclose the super/subscript in braces:

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}

\[
A^{\leftarrow}_{(x, y, z + n)}
\]

\end{document}

enter image description here

1
  • Thanks I got the error. In trying to get it right amongst my many attempts I left out the {} out of the second (x, y, z + n) parameter, and just overlooked it. Should have done a better job, of catching my typo.
    – Soham
    Commented Mar 2, 2014 at 23:51

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