4

Strange question, I guess, but I am needing a \mathsfup{\Theta} and this char is not included to the range of unicode characters. Who should I ask, if I want to obtain this letter in medium weight sans serif and upright? The unicode, ISO? Some font developer? Or this community here, to show me some hack for this symbol, which I did not find?

Any clue is welcome. Here is my MWE to start with:

% arara: lualatex

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{unicode-math}

\begin{document}
$\mathsfup{\Theta} \mathup{\Theta}$
\end{document}

enter image description here

4

Not a lot goes wrong if you use text fonts for alphabetic symbols.

enter image description here

This is just using the default latin modern setup which only seems to have theta (U+0398) not the theta symbol (U+03F4) in sans, other font sets may have both)

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{fontspec}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{unicode-math}

\begin{document}

aaa [Θ]  [ϴ] aaa

\textsf{aaa [Θ] [ϴ] aaa}



$\mathsfup{\Theta} \mathup{\Theta}$

$ [Θ] + [ϴ] + [\textsf{Θ}]+  [\textsf{ϴ}] $
\end{document}
  • Thanks, good to know, they exist. But I don't want to copy the chars somewhere. I searched for the unicode in unicode-math and found \upTheta for 0398 and \upvarTheta for 03F4. The latter sorted under "Upright Greek, lowercase". Strange! Could you edit your answer to direct use of the unicode, so that we can see, which one is which? – LaRiFaRi Mar 9 '14 at 9:54
1

If you wish to have a character added to character code standards, contact the Unicode Consortium. Adding MATHEMATICAL SANS-SERIF CAPITAL THETA might be realistic, especially if you cite ISO 80000-1, but it would take time and effort. And it’s not really needed in order to get the symbol in your documents, in TeX or otherwise. You can simply use the normal theta character and format it as sans-serif. The MATHEMATICAL... characters have been taken into Unicode to let people use symbols in plain text so that a distinction is made, say, between a “normal” letter and the same letter in a sans-serif font, in some cases. But using TeX, you are surely not limited to plain text!

As I write in an answer that I just posted to How should I typeset the physical dimensions of quantities? (where the theta problem is mentioned in comments), it seems that the simplest solution is to use the \sf command:

\sf{\Theta}

This works as such in math mode, too, since capital Greek letters are not italicized by default there.

  • Thank you, but this does not work for me. Also when I add the \ which you have forgotten. Do you load some more packages. Thanks for the link and you are absolutely right about 80000. – LaRiFaRi Mar 9 '14 at 10:18
  • @LaRiFaRi, sorry for missing `, added it now. I didn’t use any extra packages. What happens when you try $\sf{\Theta}$`? – Jukka K. Korpela Mar 9 '14 at 12:55

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