6

This question already has an answer here:

I would like to align these two side by side systems of equations horizontally. I tried to do this like this

\documentclass[12pt,letterpaper]{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\begin{center}
\begin{tabular}{p{4cm}p{4cm}}
{\begin{align}
&\alpha =\alpha_{1}=\sqrt[3]{19}\nonumber \\
&\alpha_{2} =\varepsilon\sqrt[3]{19}\nonumber \\
&\alpha_{3} =\varepsilon^2\sqrt[3]{19}\nonumber
\end{align}}
&
{\begin{align}
&\beta =\beta_{1}=\frac{1+\sqrt[3]{19}+\sqrt[3]{19^2}}{3}\nonumber \\
&\beta_{2}=\frac{1+\varepsilon\sqrt[3]{19}+\varepsilon^2\sqrt[3]{19^2}}{3}\nonumber \\
&\beta_{3}=\frac{1+\varepsilon^2\sqrt[3]{19}+\varepsilon\sqrt[3]{19^2}}{3}\nonumber 
\end{align}}
\end{tabular}
\end{center}
\end{document}

and I get this enter image description here

How can I align all beta's horizontally with alpha's?

marked as duplicate by jub0bs, Adam Liter, Guido, Peter Jansson, barbara beeton Mar 14 '14 at 21:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • A tip: If you indent lines by 4 spaces, they'll be marked as a code sample. You can also highlight the code and click the "code" button (with "{}" on it). – jub0bs Mar 14 '14 at 18:32
  • Is there a reason you can't place both sets into the same align? In other words, do you need to place the systems in two separate columns of a tabular? – Steven B. Segletes Mar 14 '14 at 18:36
  • 1
    @StevenB.Segletes They have to be in two separated columns. All I want is to have the right system at the same level as the left is. I guess this will force the equations on the left hand side to separate a bit more. – user124471 Mar 14 '14 at 18:41
9

The alignenvironment supports several groups of alignment. And the \nonumber command is useless: it suffices to use the align*environment. I give two possibilities:

        \documentclass[12pt,letterpaper]{article}
        \usepackage{amsmath}
        \begin{document}

        \begin{align*}
        \alpha=\alpha_{1}&= \sqrt[3]{19} &\beta=\beta_{1}&= \frac{1+\sqrt[3]{19}+\sqrt[3]{19^2}}{3}\nonumber \\
        \alpha_{2} &= \varepsilon\sqrt[3]{19} & \beta_{2} &= \frac{1+\varepsilon\sqrt[3]{19}+\varepsilon^2\sqrt[3]{19^2}}{3}\\
        \alpha_{3} &= \varepsilon^2\sqrt[3]{19} &\beta_{3} &= \frac{1+\varepsilon^2\sqrt[3]{19}+\varepsilon\sqrt[3]{19^2}}{3}
        \end{align*}
        Other possibility: 
        \begin{align*}
        & \alpha= \alpha_{1}= \sqrt[3]{19}&&\beta=\beta_{1}= \frac{1+\sqrt[3]{19}+\sqrt[3]{19^2}}{3}\nonumber \\
        &\alpha_{2}= \varepsilon\sqrt[3]{19} & &\beta_{2}= \frac{1+\varepsilon\sqrt[3]{19}+\varepsilon^2\sqrt[3]{19^2}}{3}\\
        &\alpha_{3}= \varepsilon^2\sqrt[3]{19} & &\beta_{3}= \frac{1+\varepsilon^2\sqrt[3]{19}+\varepsilon\sqrt[3]{19^2}}{3}
        \end{align*}
        \end{document}

enter image description here

  • Did you post the code you intended? It appears to be the same as the OP's, and does not give the result you indicate. Just sayin' – Steven B. Segletes Mar 14 '14 at 18:58
  • @StevenB.Segletes: no, it's not what I meant, of course. Mingled with my clipboard manager. I'll update at once. – Bernard Mar 14 '14 at 19:01
  • I figured as much. It happens. – Steven B. Segletes Mar 14 '14 at 19:02
  • Thank you Bernard. Brilliant. The other possibility is exactly what I am after. – user124471 Mar 14 '14 at 19:12

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