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In this site, it is described how chicago citation should look like; the date of the book, for example, are at the end. Also, as far as I know, when you cite in the text the citation isn't included in the main text but it goes as a footnote at the end of the page.

So, if I make a footnote commenting on something that I don't want in the main text and I have a citation in the footnote, how this will be cited? Also, why there is a difference here and how it should properly look like?

EDIT

How could we force bibLaTeX not to change the name and the surname of author cited? For example I want to reference World Bank and in Reference list it writes Bank, World, which is not what I need.

  • 1
    Is this a question about CMS or about TeX? Right now, it seems to be about the former which seems to be off-topic for this site. If it is intended to be a question about the latter, please post a Minimal Working Example of your code and explain a bit more clearly what you are trying to do. Note that the question you linked to largely explains the disparities if you read through the answers. Note, too, that CMS is really two styles. I take it you are trying to use the notes-and-bibliography one but please confirm. (Should be obvious from your MWE.) – cfr Mar 20 '14 at 1:20
  • Maybe it's both. For instance, I found to figure it out with opcit package. I'll see the result. – Y_gr Mar 20 '14 at 11:34
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There are two distinct "Chicago" styles: one in which citations are basically put into footnotes, and one which uses the author/date style, when citations generally go in parentheses in the text. They not only produce different citation styles, but slightly different bibliographies, because it makes sense in an author/date style to print the date immediately after the author, whereas in a footnote style it doesn't. You have to decide which to use.

In either case, so long as you use biblatex, the biblatex-chicago package will take care of things for you. For the author/date style, you load it with the option authordate, and for the notes style you load it with the option notes.

The biblatex-chicago package is a stable, maintained and well-documented package. Its only peculiarity is that it is loaded not as a biblatex style, but as a complete package. I cannot speak for the consistency of bibtex chicago styles, but as your question suggests you use biblatex (a sound choice in this case) I assume that is what you are interested in.

So far as names are concerned, institutional names should always be protected by braces: so in the case where the author is "World Bank", your .bib file should have

... author = {{World Bank}}

The following is a small example of the notes style:

\documentclass[a5paper]{article}

\usepackage[notes]{biblatex-chicago}
\addbibresource{biblatex-examples.bib}% Standard file

\begin{document}

If we are using the Notes style, loaded with
\begin{verbatim}
\usepackage[notes]{biblatex-chicago}
\end{verbatim} then citations such as this \autocite{reese} 
are put in the notes. If a citation is expressly put in a 
footnote\footnote{As if we decided to cite a work in the 
  footnote like this: \autocite{cotton}.}
the package takes care of that for us. All we
need use is \verb|\autocite{}|. In this case, the year
comes \emph{last} in the bibliography.

\printbibliography

\end{document}

notes style

And the following is a small example of the authordate style:

\documentclass[a5paper]{article}

\usepackage[authordate]{biblatex-chicago}
\addbibresource{biblatex-examples.bib}% Standard file

\begin{document}

If we are using the author/date style, loaded with
\begin{verbatim}
\usepackage[authordate]{biblatex-chicago}
\end{verbatim} then citations such as this \autocite{reese} 
are put in the text. If a citation is expressly put in a 
footnote\footnote{As if we decided to cite a work in the footnote 
  like this \autocite{cotton}.} 
the package takes care of that for us too. All we
need use is \verb|\autocite{}|. In this case, the year 
comes \emph{first} in the bibliography.

As with all author/date styles, it's often useful to 
use the \verb|\textcite| command in this case as well, 
in case we want to say that \textcite{cotton} have said 
something of interest.\footnote{And that might be true 
  in a footnote as well, if \textcite{cotton} had something 
  to tell us.}

\printbibliography

\end{document}

author/date style

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you very much, Paul. A brief question what if we use BibTex? What should change from your code? – Y_gr Mar 21 '14 at 12:50
  • Well, it will then depend entirely on the particular (combination) of packages/bibliography styles you are using. (Assuming you don't just mean using bibTeX as a "backend" for biblatex. I'm not really au fait with them (though there is a chicago style); but I think in this case biblatex is the way to go, if you can. – Paul Stanley Mar 21 '14 at 14:24

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