1

by using the \newtheorem, the latex does not number the theorems in the right order.

used code is

\newtheorem{theo.a}{Proposition}
\begin{theo.a}
this is the proposition.
\end{theo.a}

changing into

\newtheorem{theo.a}{Proposition}[2]
\begin{theo.a}
this is the proposition.
\end{theo.a}

leads to a wrong output as well (Proposition 1 is replaced by Proposition .1)

output

  • What exactly are you trying to do here? There is no counter called 2 any ways. – daleif Apr 3 '14 at 12:13
  • I try to construct "Proposition 2" – user49042 Apr 3 '14 at 12:20
  • You are aware that using theo.a a second time, it will print Proposition 2?!? Numbers are automatic. – daleif Apr 3 '14 at 12:23
  • Your are right. I forgot to say, that I don't use them in the right order. (first prop 2, then prop 1) My fault.. – user49042 Apr 3 '14 at 12:30
  • Why, wouldn't that confuse the reader? – daleif Apr 3 '14 at 12:37
2

Please always post complete small documents, not unusable fragments however like most latex counter constructs,

\newtheorem{theo.a}{Proposition}

defines theo.a to increment the counter before printing it so if you want to start at Proposition 42 then you just need

\setcounter{theo.a}{41}
\begin{theo.a}
this is the proposition.
\end{theo.a}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.