2

In some environments as parallel footnotes are printed at the end of the environment itself - as the author writes in the guide. However, for I've some other footnotes in the same page, for the sake of uniformity, I'd like to have all them together, at the bottom of the page. Is it possible to produce an hack moving those notes? I consider this solution: Can I get a normal footnote in a minipage environment in LaTeX? How?, but this way (if I'm not wrong) I obtain, in the same page, for instance, a first note 1 from footnotemark and a second note 1 which is a "normal" note (with \footnote) Thanx!

EDIT

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\usepackage{polyglossia}

\usepackage{parallel}
\newenvironment{verseparallel}[2]
{\begin{Parallel}{}{}\footnotesize\parindent=0pt
\ParallelLText{#1}\ParallelRText{#2}}
{\end{Parallel}}

\begin{document}
\begin{verseparallel}
{To be, or not to be: that is the question:\\
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer\\
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,\\
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,\\
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;}
{To be, or not to be: that is the question:\\
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer\\
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,\\
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,\\
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;\footnotemark[1]}%
\footnotetext[1]{Shakespeare Hamlet, III 1}
\end{verseparallel}
\bigskip

To be, or not to be\footnote{Shakespeare Hamlet, III 1}: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous
fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them?
To die: to sleep;\footnotemark[3]\footnotetext[3]{Shakespeare Hamlet, III 1}

\end{document}

You'll realize that there is a problem with footnotes numbers. There is a not fully manual method to set them correctly? If not, I have to add every time something as:

To be, or not to be\addtocounter{footnote}{+1}\footnote{Shakespeare
Hamlet, III 1}: that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind
to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms
against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to
sleep;\footnotemark[3]\footnotetext[3]{Shakespeare Hamlet, III 1}
  • 1
    Could you please add your (minimum working) example to your post? It would be a fine starting point for the solvers, especially if your code is fully compilable. – Malipivo Apr 12 '14 at 22:39
3

Note that I'm assuming you meant to ask if there was not a fully automatic method. If you really want an entirely manual method, that is certainly possible!

Assuming you meant automatic...

In some cases you will need to adjust the counter manually but not in a relatively straightforward case like this one:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\usepackage{polyglossia}

\usepackage{parallel}
\newenvironment{verseparallel}[2]
{\begin{Parallel}{}{}\footnotesize\parindent=0pt
\ParallelLText{#1}\ParallelRText{#2}}
{\end{Parallel}}

\begin{document}
\begin{verseparallel}
{To be, or not to be: that is the question:\\
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer\\
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,\\
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,\\
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;}
{To be, or not to be: that is the question:\\
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer\\
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,\\
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,\\
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;\footnotemark}%
\footnotetext{Shakespeare Hamlet, III 1}
\end{verseparallel}
\bigskip

To be, or not to be\footnote{Shakespeare Hamlet, III 1}: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous
fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them?
To die: to sleep;\footnote{Shakespeare Hamlet, III 1}

\end{document}

Footnotes

  • Yes, it's exactly what I need. Simple but fine working solution. Thanx! – user41063 Apr 13 '14 at 1:01
  • @user41063 I did more undoing than doing - I think the problem was simpler than you probably thought! – cfr Apr 13 '14 at 1:06
  • Yes, in any case, all's well that ends well. Thanx! – user41063 Apr 13 '14 at 20:10

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