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I use XeLaTeX and while using the breqn package, although it breaks the equations in multiple lines I get badboxes. Why is that happening? The package isn't breaking automatically and correctly the equations? How can I fix it? Also if I load the unicode-math before the breqn I get errors but if I load it after it I get weird results:

This is without the unicode-math and with badboxes:

enter image description here

and this is with the unicode-math and without badboxes:

enter image description here

The code I used is:

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage[top=0.3in, bottom=1.2in, left=0.8in, right=0.8in]{geometry}

\usepackage{multicol}

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}

\setlength{\parindent}{0cm}

\usepackage{xltxtra}
\usepackage{xgreek}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{GFSDidot.otf}
\setsansfont[Mapping=tex-text]{GFSDidot.otf}


\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{breqn}
\usepackage{unicode-math}

\newcommand{\3}{\vspace{0.3cm}}

\title{}
\author{}
\date{}

\begin{document}

\begin{dmath*}
f(x) = \sum_{k=0}^{\infty}
\frac{f^{(k)}(c)}{k!}(x-c)^{k}
= f(c)+f’(c)(x-c) +\frac{f’’(c)}{2!}(x-c)^{2}
+ \frac{f^{(3)}(c)}{3!}(x-c)^{3}+\cdots
\end{dmath*}

\end{document}

Also if I use this code:

\begin{document}

\begin{dgroup*}
\begin{dmath*}
e^{jz}=\cos z+j\sin z
\end{dmath*}
\begin{dmath*}
\cos z=(1/2)(2\cos z)=(1/2)(2\cos z+j\sin z-j\sin z)=(1/2)(\cos z+j\sin z+\cos z-j\sin z)=(1/2)(e^{jz}+e^{-jz})
\end{dmath*}
\end{dgroup*}


\end{document}

enter image description here

it doesn't break the equation at all except if I remove the unicode-math:

enter image description here

One more thing is that in these cases there was plenty of room so there was no need to "break" the equations just yet. Why did it do it anyway? What is going on here?

  • I should have mentioned that I use XeLaTeX. – Adam Apr 18 '14 at 3:29
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    Some more breqn woes, at tex.stackexchange.com/questions/119811/… – Steven B. Segletes Apr 18 '14 at 4:09
  • 1
    I'm quite certain that breqn doesn't work with unicode-math, because they fight over the same constructions. My own experience tells me that breqn doesn't do what it's supposed to; others may think differently. – egreg Apr 18 '14 at 9:22

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