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I am using LaTeX and the default font that it is providing. I was wondering if there are any other fonts available I can have. My preamble is:

\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{book}

%\usepackage{showframe}% just for the example
\usepackage{etoolbox}
\usepackage{changepage}% http://ctan.org/pkg/changepage
\usepackage{lipsum}% http://ctan.org/pkg/lipsum
\setcounter{secnumdepth}{-2} %For chapter/section not being visible in text
\let\cleardoublepage\clearpage
\usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}


\usepackage[english, greek]{babel}
\usepackage{blindtext}
\usepackage[pdftex]{graphicx}

\newcommand{\gr}{\selectlanguage{greek}}
\newcommand{\en}{\selectlanguage{english}}

\usepackage[a4paper, inner=1.5cm, outer=3cm, top=2cm, bottom=3cm, bindingoffset=1cm]{geometry}
\usepackage[onehalfspacing]{setspace}
\pagestyle{fancy}
\fancyhf{}

What can I do to try other fonts too? The default one I'm getting is a little bit weird.

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  • For other font packages, cf. The LaTeX Font Catalogue. For greek fonts, cf. the Greek topic at CTAN.
    – Sverre
    Apr 22, 2014 at 14:48
  • If you are willing to use XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX (needed for fontspec) you can use any open type font that you have on your system; The Greek Font Society might be a good place to look: greekfontsociety.gr/pages/gr_about.html Apr 22, 2014 at 14:54
  • What if I stick with Latex? Can I have just a couple of fonts available with it?
    – Stefanos
    Apr 22, 2014 at 14:57
  • 1
    Is there a big difference if I decide to use XeLaTex
    – Stefanos
    Apr 22, 2014 at 14:59
  • 1
    I don't think so. It runs slower, and there are a few areas (e.g., IIRC, the microtype package) where it is not fully supported, but for someone working in unicode who needs easy access to "non-standard" fonts, I think it's an obvious choice. But I'm not an expert (in that or Greek fonts!) which is why this is a comment not an answer. There are proper experts here who may be able to comment. You might like to have a look at tex.stackexchange.com/questions/3094/drawbacks-of-xetex-luatex. Apr 22, 2014 at 15:05

1 Answer 1

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You have the GFS font collection (8 fonts), developped by the Greek Font Society (whence the name) that exist in opentype and type 1 formats and can be used by (pdf)LaTeX as well as XeLaTeX and LuaLaTeX. They also have latin letters, except 2 of them: Porson and Baskerville, but there is LaTeX support for (latin) Baskerville.

At least for a part of them, there is some support for maths (I didn't check for all). For instance, GFS Artemisia relies on tx fonts, except of course for Greek letters. From this page of the LaTeX Catalogue, you will have access to all the details and font samples that you might want.

Using them is simple: if you're using (pdf)LaTeX, just write \usepackage{artemisia} in your preamble. If you're using Xe/LuaLaTeX, it's just

\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont{GFS Artemisia}
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  • Thanks..!! Any lead on how I can use them ?
    – Stefanos
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:14
  • The details are in the docs (not fully, however). I'll add a word about that to my answer.
    – Bernard
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:27
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    Thank you Bernard..!! I'm using (pdf)LaTex and I just added \usepackage{artemisia} and I got an error: file artemisia.sty not found. I installed it from the Synaptic package manager, closed Kile and compiled again but got the same error again. Any idea what is wrong?
    – Stefanos
    Apr 22, 2014 at 19:23
  • How did you install it? Via TLMGr (if you use TeX Live) or MiKTeX Package Manager ? or by hand?
    – Bernard
    Apr 22, 2014 at 19:25
  • Well... neither. Just the Operating system's Package manager. It was available in the repositories.
    – Stefanos
    Apr 22, 2014 at 19:28

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