3
 $$\mathrm{err} \left( h(\vec{\theta}, \vec{x}), y \right)
= \delta_{0y} ~ H \left( h(\vec{x}; \vec{\theta}) - \frac{1}{2} \right)
+ \delta_{1y} ~ H \left( \frac{1}{2} - h(\vec{x}; \vec{\theta}) \right)$$
0

2 Answers 2

9
  1. You should never use $$ in LaTeX, see Why is \[ … \] preferable to $$?

  2. “err” should be a math operator.

  3. Never use a ~ in math mode; multiplication doesn't want space.

  4. \left and \right add unwanted space when they surround the argument to a function.

  5. A \vec near a closed parenthesis needs a thin space.

  6. There's no need to have big parentheses for the argument to err; I'd use normal size, but I show also how to get slighly bigger ones.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\DeclareMathOperator{\err}{err}

\begin{document}
First version
\[
\err( h(\vec{\theta}, \vec{x}\,), y )
= \delta_{0y} H \biggl( h(\vec{x}; \vec{\theta}\,) - \frac{1}{2} \biggr)
+ \delta_{1y} H \biggl( \frac{1}{2} - h(\vec{x}; \vec{\theta}\,) \biggr)
\]

Second version
\[
\err\bigl( h(\vec{\theta}, \vec{x}\,), y \bigr)
= \delta_{0y} H \biggl( h(\vec{x}; \vec{\theta}\,) - \frac{1}{2} \biggr)
+ \delta_{1y} H \biggl( \frac{1}{2} - h(\vec{x}; \vec{\theta}\,) \biggr)
\]

\end{document}

enter image description here

Other options include not having \DeclareMathOperator{\err}{err} in the preamble but the equivalent \operatorname{err} in the formula and using \tfrac{1}{2} as suggested by daleif, although I'm not sure about this. Here's the example.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

Third version
\[
\operatorname{err}\bigl( h(\vec{\theta}, \vec{x}\,), y \bigr)
= \delta_{0y} H \bigl( h(\vec{x}; \vec{\theta}\,) - \tfrac{1}{2} \bigr)
+ \delta_{1y} H \bigl( \tfrac{1}{2} - h(\vec{x}; \vec{\theta}\,) \bigr)
\]

\end{document}

enter image description here

7
  • Almost identical to what I was about to post, the only addition I had was to add phantom vertical spacing on the vector arrows \vec{x\vphantom{\theta} so that they are the same height. May 10, 2014 at 22:44
  • @PeterGrill I wouldn't do it; I wouldn't use the arrow for the vector, either.
    – egreg
    May 10, 2014 at 22:48
  • @egreg: once more I forgot to check if an answer was posted while I was checking mine! However I have smaller parentheses through the use of nccmath for fractions.
    – Bernard
    May 10, 2014 at 22:56
  • 1
    Would look even better using \tfrac
    – daleif
    May 11, 2014 at 7:40
  • 1
    @Problemania For $$ see Why is \[ … \] preferable to $$?; for the operator you can use \operatorname{err} in the formula, which is better than \mathrm in this case (and is equivalent to what you get if you define \err as shown in the preamble).
    – egreg
    May 11, 2014 at 17:52
2

Supposing it is a LaTeX document, first replace $$ … $$ with \[ … \]. Also define err as a math operator to have a correct horizontal spacing. Then you can use the nccmath package to use medium sized fractions, and replace \left … \right with the manually adjusted \Bigl … \Bigr:

\documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article}

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}

\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{nccmath} 

\DeclareMathOperator{\err}{err}

\begin{document}

\[ \err\bigl( h(\vec{\theta}, \vec{x}), y \bigr) = \delta_{0y}\,H\Bigl(h( \vec{x}; \vec{\theta}) - \mfrac{1}{2} \Bigr) + \delta_{1y}\, H\Bigl( \mfrac{1}{2} - h(\vec{x}; \vec{\theta}) \Bigr) \]

\end{document}

enter image description here

2
  • FYI, I used to use the nccmath package package but ran into numerous issues that I decided to drop it. See Is there a replacement for nccmath? and the problems listed in the question. May 10, 2014 at 23:27
  • @Peter Grill: I know that (can't remember under which exact circumstances, but I never met those difficulties). The closest would be the \mathsmaller command from relsize. Maybe you should try to contact the author of nccmath — in my opinion, this concept of medium sized math formulae is really useful, as you can see from this example.
    – Bernard
    May 10, 2014 at 23:33

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