2

I'm trying to use {pdfpages} to create a framed, 2-page, landscape layout. I'm having trouble with the layout. I want the pdf to take up the entire page. Can someone give me some tips? How do I remove the borders at the top and bottom of this page?

\documentclass[letterpaper]{book}
\usepackage{pdfpages}
\usepackage{geometry}
\begin{document}
\pagestyle{empty}

\includepdf[pages=-,nup=1x2,landscape,frame]{stitch}
\end{document}

enter image description here

  • Take a look at pages 9, 10 and 11 of the pdfpages documentation – Mario S. E. Jun 7 '14 at 11:54
  • Still lost. I was able to center the page, but I still have margins at the top and bottom. How do you stretch the .pdf to cover the entire page? – Linter Jun 7 '14 at 13:13
  • I thought fitpaper=true would work, but it doesn't. – Linter Jun 7 '14 at 13:21
  • Is stick.pdf also of letterpaper size? – LianTze Lim Jun 7 '14 at 14:58
  • Hi, LianTze. Yes. It is the same size. – Linter Jun 8 '14 at 10:50
6

Letter paper size: 8.5in × 11in.

You want to have two letter papers scaled down, side by side on a landscape letter paper:

height(P') = width(P) = 8.5 in
width(P') = (width(P) / height(P)) * height(P') = (8.5 in/11 in) * 8.5 in = 289/44 in ≈ 6.57 in

Then the longer side of the final page is:

2 * width(P') = 289/22 in ≈ 13.14 in

That is too large for a letter paper and the included pages are scaled further down, leaving margins at the top and bottom.

A* paper sizes

The A* paper series are designed in such a way, that two A(n) pages can be scaled down to A(n+1) and they will fit on a landscape A(n) page.

Different output paper size

Output size, larger than letter paper:

\documentclass[letterpaper]{book}
\usepackage{pdfpages}
\usepackage[
  paperheight=8.5in,
  paperwidth=\dimexpr1in*289/22\relax,
]{geometry}
\begin{document}
  \includepdf[pages=-,nup=2x1,frame]{letterdouble}
\end{document}

Final paper size: ≈13.14 in × 8.5 in

Output size smaller than letter paper

\documentclass[letterpaper]{book}
\usepackage{pdfpages}
\usepackage[
  paperheight=\dimexpr1in*121/17\relax, % 11in/(8.5in*2) * 11in
  paperwidth=11in,
]{geometry}
\begin{document}
  \includepdf[pages=-,nup=2x1,frame]{letterdouble}
\end{document}

Final paper size: 11 in × ≈7.12 in

  • Aha. I see now. I've changed my original .pdf to a4 and then used a4 for the output size using pdfpages. Looks great now. Thank you Heiko! – Linter Jun 8 '14 at 12:08

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