6

Long permille sign

Hi all, I have found a publication using this permille sign with Times New Roman font. I have tried the textcomp \textperthousand and wasysym \permil commands but it does not yield this symbol. This one extends below the character line. Does anyone know of it? Also, I pasted the character into Word and it gives me an ampersand (&) (position 7 on most character maps), with font name as AdvPSMPE7. Any help or tip will be greatly appreciated.

  • 6
    A minimal compilable example of the code is always welcomed. – Manuel Jun 13 '14 at 23:19
  • 1
    It looks to me like the permille symbol in your screenshot was "borrowed" from a non-Times Roman font: it doesn't match the look of Times Roman at all, its height exceeds the ascender height of Times Roman by a wide margin, and it's very poorly placed. For a "real" \textperthousand macro in a Times Roman look, try using the newtxtext package. If you use LuaLaTeX or XeLaTeX, you could use the XITS font. – Mico Jun 13 '14 at 23:43
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    Many Unicode fonts have this symbol: it's character U-2040 (and U-2041 is pertenthousand symbol. With XeLaTeX, it is enough to type \char "2040 in the current font provided it has that symbol. – Bernard Jun 13 '14 at 23:53
  • Not sure if they changed the unicode character in the last 4 years, but the perthousand and pertenthousand characters are U-2030 and U-2031. – ArTourter Aug 4 '18 at 17:10
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If your main document font is Times Roman or a clone thereof, I would strongly recommend not using the per-thousand symbol you've reproduced in the screenshot: It's too big, it's poorly placed, and it won't mesh visually with the font's per-cent symbol.

Assuming you use a font package that features a \textperthousand macro, just use it.

Here's an example using pdfLaTeX and the newtxtext and newtxmath packages:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{newtxtext,newtxmath,amsmath}
\begin{document}
range of $-20.9$\textperthousand\ to $-18.4$\textperthousand

\bigskip
$1\% = 10\text{\textperthousand}$ 
\end{document}

And here's what you'd get using the same in-document code but with LuaLaTeX and the XITS and XITS Math Opentype fonts:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont{XITS}
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\setmathfont{XITS Math}
\begin{document}
range of $-20.9\textperthousand$ to $-18.4\textperthousand$ 

\bigskip

$1\% = 10\textperthousand$
\end{document}
4
\documentclass[]{scrartcl}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{mathptmx}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\def\permille{\ensuremath{{}^\text{o}\mkern-5mu/\mkern-3mu_\text{oo}}}
\begin{document}

$-20.9\,\permille $ \qquad
\tiny\permille\small\permille\Large\permille\Huge\permille

\end{document}

enter image description here

  • Thanks for all your input guys. Yes, I don't know the origin of this symbol at all, but it appears like this in numerous publications. It actually appears in really old publications from the 50's or so, before we had modern PC's so it's pretty old too. This paper was done in 2005. Is it possible there was an old package being used which has been replaced now? Also, does anyone know how to decipher the name of the font when it says Adv infront? You always get it when you paste from pdf. – Adrian Jun 14 '14 at 11:21
1

It might be easier to enter directly by a copy and paste the character ‰ instead of searching either a code \char "2040 or the name of a markup \textperthousand or even to build a macro \def\permille{\ensuremath{{}^\text{o}\mkern-5mu/\mkern-3mu_\text{oo}}}. And this is permitted by xelatex :

% These lines tell TeXworks to typeset with xelatex, and to open and
% save the source with Unicode encoding.
% !TEX program = xelatex
% !TEX encoding = UTF-8 Unicode
\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article}
\begin{document}

range of -20.9‰ to -18.4‰ will work

\end{document}

If you have maths using greek characters and symbols, add unicode-math package and by compiling with $ xelatex foo.tex, you may enter ‰ as well as any symbol or greek character directly:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\begin{document}
  \begin{align*}
   ∫_C\frac{dt}{t^{α}(1+t)}=e^{-iπα}2iπ
  \end{align*}
\end{document}
  • Welcome to TeX.SX! We appreciate your effort of helping others, but you should be careful to answer what the OP is asking or, if you have an specific reason for not doing that, please clarify in your answer. – Phelype Oleinik Jan 29 '18 at 17:43

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