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I am currently working on the layout of my thesis and not completely certain how to implement this feature. There are two things i wish to achieve:

  • A dedicated page for each chapter
  • Chapter names being visible in TOC

The TOC structure im looking for is:

 Chapter 1: Some chapter name

 1 Some title
      1.1 Something elegant ........................................ 5

 Chapter 2: Some differnet chapter name

 2 Another title
      2.1 Something super elegant .................................. 6

Now for each chapter page im looking for something like following:

Chapter 1

Some chapter name

My starting point is simply a Chapter x heading for each chapter created by using following piece of code:

\usepackage{sectsty}
\chapterfont{\large\sc\centering}
\chaptertitlefont{\centering}
\subsubsectionfont{\centering}
  • i'm not familiar with the use of sectsty, but it is relatively trivial with the basic toc mechanism to start a new page for each chapter. just before the \chapter command (in the chapter file, if you use \include), insert a command \addtocontents{toc}{\newpage}. – barbara beeton Jun 16 '14 at 16:53
  • If i use it along with sectsty it still wont appear in the TOC. The TOC looks the same as my example. But a new page appears with Chapter x and the chapter name. – JavaCake Jun 16 '14 at 17:24
  • If we assume i use this method. The next problem is that i have another chapter afterward the Chapter 1.. which is 1 Some title, this suddenly becomes 2 instead of 1.. – JavaCake Jun 16 '14 at 17:56
  • I just realised what im trying to achieve can simply be done with \part{..}. Sorry for wasting your time. – JavaCake Jun 16 '14 at 18:00
  • adding a \newpage command to the toc file cannot produce the results you are seeing. a compilable minimal example. beginning with \documentclass and ending with \end{document} will be needed to figure out what is happening. – barbara beeton Jun 16 '14 at 18:03
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The question was solved by the OP, with the solution left in a comment:

I just realised what I'm trying to achieve can simply be done with \part{...}.

For this question, using \part sectioning elements instead of \chapter provided the desired output without needing to fiddle with the chapter formatting settings.

  • Nice, another one off the list :-) – Johannes_B Jun 7 '15 at 16:15

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