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This question already has an answer here:

I have a list of equations that I want to enumerate using itemize. The equations should also be numbered equations. This is no problem if those equations fit onto one line -- I just typeset them between dollar signs (and use the macro from the first answer to How to label text with equation number? to number things). The problem arises when some of the equations take multiple lines. I want to use \begin{split} to split them up. The problem is that using \begin{equation} and \begin{split} forces everything to be on a new line, and I want this stuff to appear on the line with the big dot from itemize. It won't let me use split in in-line math. How can I get this to work?

EDIT : Here is an example to illustrate what I want:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}

\begin{itemize}
\item \[\begin{split}
7x+2y = &3z+7w\\
        &+23654
\end{split}\]
\end{itemize}

\end{document}

The problem with the above is two-fold : first, the math is on a separate line from the big dot, and second it is centered. I ignored the numbering at this point to make things easier to understand.

marked as duplicate by egreg, user31729, Werner, Ian Thompson, Masroor Jul 10 '14 at 21:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Welcome to TeX.SX! Please help us to help you and add a minimal working example (MWE) that illustrates your problem. It will be much easier for us to reproduce your situation and find out what the issue is when we see compilable code, starting with \documentclass{...} and ending with \end{document}. – darthbith Jul 10 '14 at 19:55
  • Added something. Let me know if it is unclear what I want. – Sarah P Jul 10 '14 at 20:05
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\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\begin{itemize}
\item $\begin{aligned}[t] 
        7x+2y &=3z+7w \\
              &\phantom{=}+23654   
       \end{aligned}$
\end{itemize}
\end{document}

aligned

  • \displaystyle is unneeded. However I'm pretty sure this question is a duplicate. – egreg Jul 10 '14 at 20:41

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