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I am trying to customize biblatex (with biber as backend) so as to handle Japanese authors' names in an elegant way.

Lets consider the following bibtex entry:

@article{HondaSuzuki2014,
    author = {本田, 太郎 and 鈴木, 次郎},
    journal = {日本語で書かれたジャーナル},
    number = {1},
    pages = {3--23},
    title = {日本語のタイトル},
    volume = {9},
    year = {2014}
}

The authors are Honda and Suzuki. I would like the citation commands to produce the following outputs:

  • citet: blablabla Honda and Suzuki (本田,鈴木 2014) blablabla
  • citep: blablabla (本田,鈴木 2014) blablabla

I understand that I should put the transcription of the authors' names (i.e. Honda and Suzuki) in a field... but which field? Then what should I do to get the desired output? Finally, I want to keep the citations of authors in latin characters the way they are. That is:

  • citet: blablabla Smith and Winston (2014) blablabla
  • citep: blablabla (Smith and Winston 2014) blablabla

Do I need 4 different citation commands? In addition to citet and citep Something like citetj (citet for Japanese names) and citepj (citep for Japanese names)?

Any help (advice, code, reference to a good tutorial) will be greatly appreciated.

  • 2
    Currently, there is no standard way of doing this. You might be delighted to hear though that the upcoming multi-script branch 4.0 of biblatex (source of the ms dev version on github, ready made package on sourceforge) offers exactly those features. It is currently under development, but somewhat usable, and I'm sure the developers would like some real-word feedback. – moewe Jul 19 '14 at 17:23
  • @moewe Thanx for the hint! I am going through the documentation and example files but... I can not figure out how to proceed. Any lead? – Pierre Jul 19 '14 at 20:58
  • The version is not released yet, so any information is to be seen as tentative. The manual that comes with the sourceforge package does have something on the so called variant fields though (pp. 14 sq.). I forget to mention you also need the experimental version of biber on sourceforge. – moewe Jul 20 '14 at 6:48
  • You could check the discussion about the experimental features: github.com/plk/biblatex/issues/132 (I haven't had time yet to test the last developments). – Ulrike Fischer Jul 20 '14 at 10:00
  • 1
    The documentation for the 4.0 experimental branch is updated with all of the new multiscript features (called "variants") and there are examples in the documentation. The bibtex .bib format understood by biber has been augmented to allow this functionality. You'll find details in the PDF doc and also on the github thread mentioned above. I welcome any feedback on this. – PLK Jul 20 '14 at 18:43
1

Probably this thread will help to solve part of your problem how-to-create-multilingual-english-japanese-bibliographies-with-biblatex, see the answer by PLK (almost at the bottom of the page.)

Your bibliography should be structured in following manner:

    @article{HondaSuzuki2014,
    LANGID = {japanese}
    author = {本田, 太郎 and 鈴木, 次郎},
    author_romanised = {}
    journal = {日本語で書かれたジャーナル},
    journal_romanised = {}
    number = {1},
    pages = {3--23},
    title = {日本語のタイトル},
    title_romanised = {},
    volume = {9},
    year = {2014}
}

Regarding \cite command, can not help.

  • Though it was discussed in the comments, a nota bene that this solution is for the as yet unreleased biblatex 4.0 would not go amiss. – moewe Jul 24 '14 at 16:58
  • @moewe the bib. item structure is for biblatex 3.0, which is now available at sourceforge.net for more information please see original post by PLK in this thread. – olgis Jul 25 '14 at 9:45
  • Certainly, my point was that it would not be a bad idea to mention this in your answer. We generally refrain from posting link-only answers; so your answer would be greatly improved by noting that this structure is only available in a (as of now) experimental version of biblatex (that is nevertheless available to download), so one cannot expect this to work with a CTAN-up-to-date TeX distribution. (Just as PLK notes very prominently in the post you refer to.) – moewe Jul 25 '14 at 16:30

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