4

In Russian typesetting the footnote is usually placed between text & closing punctuation character, like:

this is example\footnote{footnote example}.

But this leads to empty space between the footnote marker and the punctuation character, as you can see on the image:

Example of space between footnote mark & punctuation

Is it possible to decrease this space? I've tried following redefinition, but it didn't help:

\let\origfootnote\footnote
\renewcommand{\footnote}[1]{\origfootnote{#1}\hspace{-0.6em}}

Full example:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T2A]{fontenc}
\usepackage[russian]{babel}

\begin{document}
русский текст\footnote{тест}.

\end{document}
4

You should use the package fnpct here which is doing this fix for you. Just make sure to set the punctuation sign after the footnote.

The option punct-after=true is changing the default to your Russian requirement. I did not check this behaviour with cyrillics as you have not provided an MWE.

% arara: pdflatex

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[punct-after=true]{fnpct}

\begin{document}
First example\footnote{first example footnote}.

Second example\footnote{second example footnote}:
\end{document}

enter image description here

Edit:

As mentioned by cgnieder (the author of that package) in comment you may introduce this option anywhere in your document by the local switch \setfnpct{punct-after=true}. As said before, the default in fnpct is false.

Edit 2:

The colon is not having any kerning in fnpct which does not disturb in my example. But if the distance is getting as big as in your posted image, you will have to add it to the punctuation marks treated by fnpct. This should be done like: \setfnpct{add-punct-marks={:}[0em][-.08em]} You may vary that kerning to your needs.

  • Per default fnpct does not change kerning between footnote marks and colons. They need to be added first, something like \setfnpct{add-punct-marks={:}[0em][-.08em]} – clemens Jul 24 '14 at 7:38
  • 1
    @LaRiFaRi Nevermind. English isn't my native language either. Errors are bound to happen :) – clemens Jul 24 '14 at 10:18

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