1

I attached my code for my cover letter of one job, and the picture of compiled pdf below. Can anyone help me accomplish the following things:

  • How to make my Name show on the left with certain nice space above the hline?
  • How to make my address, email and phone number show on the right with certain nice space below the hline?
  • How to make certain nice vertical space between phone number and date I put there, because I feet like it is too jammed there.
  • Any other modification or suggestion is also very welcome. For example, what about the font of the body paragraph? What about the line space between each line?
  • Forgive me not put my real application here in body paragraph
  • Just help me make this cover letter look nice and perhaps stylish.

Thanks so much guys!

   \documentclass[11pt]{letter} % Default font size of the document, change to 10pt to fit more text

    \usepackage{newcent} % Default font is the New Century Schoolbook PostScript font 
    %\usepackage{helvet} % Uncomment this (while commenting the above line) to use the Helvetica font

    % Margins
    \topmargin=-1in % Moves the top of the document 1 inch above the default
    \textheight=8.5in % Total height of the text on the page before text goes on to the next page, this can be increased in a longer letter
    \oddsidemargin=-10pt % Position of the left margin, can be negative or positive if you want more or less room
    \textwidth=6.5in % Total width of the text, increase this if the left margin was decreased and vice-versa

    \let\raggedleft\raggedright % Pushes the date (at the top) to the left, comment this line to have the date on the right

    \begin{document}

    %----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    %   ADDRESSEE SECTION
    %----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \begin{letter}{Jesse O'Dell and Eilene Powell \\
    TOP Coordinators \\
    Office of Instructional Development\\
    70 Powell Library, Box 951515\\
    Los Angeles, CA 90095-1515 } 

    %----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    %   YOUR NAME & ADDRESS SECTION
    %----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \begin{center}
    \large\bf David Harris \\ % Your name
    \vspace{20pt} 
    \hrule height 1pt % If you would like a horizontal line separating the name from the address, uncomment the line to the left of this text
    Springfield 500 \\ Los Angeles, California 99999 \\ 111-111-1111 % Your address and phone number
    \end{center} 


    \signature{David Harris} % Your name for the signature at the bottom

    %----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    %   LETTER CONTENT SECTION
    %----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \opening{Dear Coordinators Jesse O'Dell and Eilene Powell:} 
    As Livy states in The Rise of Rome about his purpose of writing history, “My wish is that each reader will pay the closest attention to the following: how men lived, what their moral principles were … then let him follow in his mind how, as discipline broke down bit by bit, morality at first foundered” (Livy, preface). Although Livy never steps forward to articulate the specific “moral principles” in the preface, he does, afterwards, demonstrate the “right” Roman values for Roman citizens to emulate, which especially focus on women’s gender roles. Indeed, by highlighting Lucretia’s dedication to her domestic duties and honoring her unhesitant suicide in the face of having been raped, Livy establishes a positive role model for Roman women, which dictates conjugal obligations and female chastity. \\\\
    By awarding Lucretia universal praise for her diligent household service even at the absence of her husband, Livy promotes and justifies his feminine ideal that as men’s property women must fulfill their marital duties, such as staying at home and obeying their husbands. According to Collatia, “Though the evening was late, they found Lucretia still in the main hall of her home, bent over her spinning and surrounded by her maids as they worked by lamplight. Lucretia was the clear winner of the contest” (Livy, 1.57). The fact that it is not Lucretia but her male counterparts who judge her loyalty displays Livy’s objectification of women. Instead of granting women freedom to value themselves, men, in Livy’s opinion, should govern women’s daily lives and evaluate their morals based on male standards. Most notably, the word “clear” illustrates how the male judgment of wifely virtues applies to Lucretia; Collatia and his companions act collectively and unanimously to select Lucretia as the most virtuous woman among their wives. Furthermore, Livy’s emphasis on the young princes’ royal status solidifies his notion of conjugal duties. Since the upper-class men prefer women with affinity to household service and conformity to their husbands, the same principle probably applies to the lower-class males as well. By integrating his view of women’s duties into the whole society from his narrative of Lucretia, Livy successfully answers and justifies one part of his “moral principles”—martial obligation—which requires women to submit to their male counterparts. \\\\
    By lauding the suicide of Lucretia and the subsequent overthrow of the monarchy, Livy identifies and reinforces another aspect of his female model—chastity. In the story, although Lucretia considers herself innocent of fault, she cannot “absolve herself from punishment” (Livy, 1.58). She claims, “Let no unchaste woman hereafter continue to live because of the precedent of Lucretia” (Livy, 1.58). The unavoidability of Lucretia’s death shows Livy’s ideal for women that purity takes precedence over any virtue. By glorifying Lucretia’s suicide as an honorable, heroic act, Livy further justifies the high value he places on women’s chastity. Moreover, Livy strengthens the notion of purity from his narrative about the destruction of Roman monarchy. Upon Lucretia’s collapse into his chest, Collatia vows, “By this blood, so pure before defilement by prince Tarquin, I hereby swear that I will drive out Lucius Tarquinius Superbus and all his progeny with sword, fire, and whatever force I can muster” (Livy, 1.58). Collatia’s vengeance for Lucretia’s unchaste body symbolizes men’s defense on women’s chastity. As a matter of fact, Livy aims at elevating female purity to such a high position that it deserves relentless protection from Roman citizens even at the cost of the collapse of government. In this way, Livy not only establishes, but also solidifies the seriousness of preserving female chastity.
    \closing{Sincerely yours,}
    \end{letter}
    \end{document}

enter image description here

2

I've always been a big advocate of setting a letter using the default article document class, since it allows you the freedom you want in a natural way. There's no need to adjust the setting of the letter class to suit your needs rather than just writing it using another (more flexible) class.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{newcent} % Default font is the New Century Schoolbook PostScript font
\usepackage{lipsum}% Just for this example
\usepackage[margin=1in]{geometry}%

\setlength{\parindent}{0pt}% No paragraph indent
\setlength{\parskip}{.3\baselineskip}

\begin{document}

%----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
%   YOUR NAME & ADDRESS SECTION
%----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

\begingroup
  \large\bfseries David Harris \par % Your name
  \vspace{\dimexpr-\parskip+20pt}
  \rule{\linewidth}{1pt}\par
  \vspace{\dimexpr-\parskip+20pt}
  \null\hfill
  \begin{tabular}{r@{}}
    Springfield 500 \\ Los Angeles, California 99999 \\ 111-111-1111 % Your address and phone number
  \end{tabular}
\endgroup

\vspace{2\baselineskip}

\today

\vspace{2\baselineskip}

%----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
%   ADDRESSEE SECTION
%----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

\begin{tabular}{@{}l}
  Jesse O'Dell and Eilene Powell \\
  TOP Coordinators \\
  Office of Instructional Development \\
  70 Powell Library, Box 951515 \\
  Los Angeles, CA 90095-1515
\end{tabular}

\vspace{2\baselineskip}

%----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
%   LETTER CONTENT SECTION
%----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Coordinators Jesse O'Dell and Eilene Powell:

\vspace{\baselineskip}

\lipsum[1-5]

\vspace{\baselineskip}

Sincerely yours,

\vspace{4\baselineskip}

David Harris% Your name for the signature at the bottom

\end{document}

All the \vspaces can be modified to suit your needs.

  • Thanks a lot! I already figured out the questions, though I got a little confused why so late my question got response. Is there something I did not pay attention to in my question? – Lawerance Aug 7 '14 at 19:34
  • @Lawerance: Nope, you did nothing wrong. In fact, you did more than most when it comes to this type of question (you provided a minimal example as well as a screen shot!). It may just be that there is different interests in terms of letters as opposed to graphics or other document classes. – Werner Aug 7 '14 at 19:37

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