5

http://www.math.illinois.edu/~berndt/gausslandenmonthly.pdf

On page 602 of this linked document (which is the 19th of 25 pages) there appears a notation for continued fractions which has been fairly conventional and found in many books and papers over quite a few decades:

enter image description here

The "+" sign is at an only slightly higher level than the denominators.

How can that be done in LaTeX?

  • 3
    You can do some thing like \newcommand{\myplus}{\mathrel{\raisebox{-1ex}{$+$}}} \newcommand{\mydots}{\mathbin{\raisebox{-1ex}{$\cdots$}}}% and use \myplus and \mydots – user11232 Aug 15 '14 at 23:11
6

Here is a solution:

\documentclass[a4paper, 11pt]{book}
\usepackage{fourier} 
\usepackage{mathtools}
\newcommand\cplus{\mathbin{\raisebox{-\height}{$+$}}}
\newcommand\contdots{\raisebox{-\height}{$\vphantom{+}\dotsm$}}

\begin{document}

 \[ \frac{a₀ }{b₀ } \cplus  \frac{a₁ }{b₁}\cplus\frac{a₂ }{b₂ }\cplus\contdots\cplus\frac{a_n}{b_n}  = S  \]%

\end{document} 

enter image description here

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