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I need some Fraktur text in a footnote of a (journal) class I cannot change. I am using yfonts and \textfrak and get the message

LaTeX Font Warning: Font shape `LY/yfrak/m/n' in size <8> not available
(Font)              size <10> substituted on input line 467.

The Fraktur text is, indeed, too big for the footnote. Is there a way to coerce 8pt?

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    Did you try the blacklettert1 package, that defines T1-encoded yfonts? I suppose you have the type1 version of yfonts?
    – Bernard
    Commented Aug 17, 2014 at 12:50
  • I didn't know of it, and it is not in TeXLive (or rather the .fd is but the .sty isn't).
    – J.J. Green
    Commented Aug 17, 2014 at 12:54
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    Could you add a sample of how you're using the Fraktur fonts?
    – egreg
    Commented Aug 17, 2014 at 13:05
  • There is not a .sty file. If you read the documentation (texdoc blacklettert1), it explains how to use the fonts in your document.
    – cfr
    Commented Aug 17, 2014 at 13:07
  • Ah, I removed the \usepackage{yfonts}, added \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} and \newcommand{\textfrak}[1]{{\fontfamily{yfrak}\selectfont #1}} and all seems to work! Bernard, could you convert you comment to an answer and I'll mark this as solved. Thanks all!
    – J.J. Green
    Commented Aug 17, 2014 at 13:11

1 Answer 1

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Yiannis Haralambous' old German fonts come equipped with font definition files tailored for old TeX distributions, when only the METAFONT sources were available for building bitmap fonts. The warning is due to the fact that the font definition file doesn't define sizes less than 10pt.

However, the fonts are now available in Type1 format, so they are freely scalable. You can simply define the yfrak family yourself and avoid any warning.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{oldgerm}
\DeclareFontFamily{U}{yfrak}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{yfrak}{m}{n}{<-> yfrak}{}

\begin{document}

\Large\textfrak{Greis:}

\large\textfrak{Greis:}

\normalsize\textfrak{Greis:}

\small\textfrak{Greis:}

\footnotesize\textfrak{Greis:}

\scriptsize\textfrak{Greis:}

\tiny\textfrak{Greis:}

\end{document}

enter image description here

Note that, for longer passages, you can use the declarative form \frakfamily (needs grouping).

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  • You may also want to mention explicitly that while \textfrak takes an argument that's rendered in Yiannis's old German font, \frakfamily is the associated switching command. (The package's other two font switching commands are \gothfamily and \swabfamily.)
    – Mico
    Commented Aug 17, 2014 at 14:24

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