4

I am in the process of writing a simple manual. In it, I explain how to set up the files and programs necessary to run a pipeline I have written. I would like to include command line commands in that file in a way that makes them stand out and easy to read.

Basically, how can I get this effect in my LaTeX document:

cd ~/foo; mkdir bar

I was thinking along the lines of a \parbox and a background color but I was hoping there might be a class that simplifies this or any other tricks. I don't need code highlighting, I just need an easy way to differentiate commands from prose.

2

I would suggest using the verbatim environment since it's straight-forward and should provide the distinction you're after. Here's a minimal example:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
I am in the process of writing a simple manual. In it, I explain how to set up the 
files and programs necessary to run a pipeline I have written. I would like to include 
command line commands in that file in a way that makes them stand out and easy to read.

Basically, how can I get this effect in my LaTeX document:
\begin{verbatim}
cd ~/foo; mkdir bar
\end{verbatim}
I was thinking along the lines of a \verb|\parbox| and a background color but I was 
hoping there might be a class that simplifies this or any other tricks. I don't need 
code highlighting, I just need an easy way to differentiate commands from prose.
\end{document}

Perhaps defining your own via functionality provided by fancyvrb or listings could also be an option, as suggested in Print programs with its proper syntax and/or Writing source code in LaTeX as text.

  • Wow, I'm currently looking at fancyrvb and it's everything I wanted and then some. Thanks! – terdon Sep 24 '14 at 17:59
4

As a variation on the verbatim theme, the numberedblock package allows you to label code blocks with a marginal number, and reference them with \ref. Depending on your application, this may prove useful, too. (see http://ctan.org/pkg/numberedblock)

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{numberedblock}
\begin{document}
I am in the process of writing a simple manual. In it, I explain how to set up the 
files and programs necessary to run a pipeline I have written. I would like to include 
command line commands in that file in a way that makes them stand out and easy to read.

Basically, how can I get this effect in my LaTeX document:

\begin{numVblock}[\nbVlabel{nb:A}]
cd ~/foo; mkdir bar
\end{numVblock}

I was thinking along the lines of a \verb|\parbox| and a background color but I was 
hoping there might be a class that simplifies this or any other tricks. I don't need 
code highlighting, I just need an easy way to differentiate commands from prose.

I can number larger blocks

\begin{numVblock}[\nbVlabel{nb:B}]
      program test
      implicit none
      integer a, x
c$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
      a = 0
      x = 1
   10 a = a + x
      if (a .eq. 100) stop
      goto 10
      end
\end{numVblock}

\noindent and can then reference code blocks \ref{nb:A} and \ref{nb:B}.
\end{document}

enter image description here

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.