3

I'm using libertine package. I see the emphasized capital J (no. 1) is a bit strange to me, compared to another fonts. Is it really the way it is? How to get it fixed?

Thanks.

enter image description here

\documentclass{book}
\usepackage{libertine}
\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}
\item \emph{Just another question.}
% the emphasized capital J looks strange when using libertine package. is it really the way it is? how to get it fixed?

% compared to another font types

\item {\fontfamily{qcs}\selectfont
\emph{Just another question.}
}

\item {\fontfamily{qtm}\selectfont
\emph{Just another question.}
}

\item {\fontfamily{qbk}\selectfont
\emph{Just another question.}
}

\item {\fontfamily{qcr}\selectfont
\emph{Just another question.}
}

\end{enumerate}
\end{document}
  • 1
    That's what I get. And the only fonts in my sample document are Libertine. So it is definitely Libertine. You probably do not want to change it. You would be much better advised to choose a different font more to your liking. Any attempt to use a J from elsewhere will mismatch things in a way which will never look right. Either learn to like the J or pick another font. [It is possible that the opentype versions include alternate characters. If the package does not support this for (pdf)TeX, consider Xe/LuaTeX instead.] – cfr Sep 25 '14 at 2:43
  • @cfr Thank you, cfr. You're right. I don't want to change it. I'll stick with it for now. // I never use other font than Libertine. Could you please advise me another font sets/packages (in LaTeX) which look better, nicer, and commonly used in book type-setting? Thank you very much. – Eko san Sep 25 '14 at 6:34
  • 1
    font designers sometimes take the opportunity to exercise their imagination more freely when designing italic fonts. letters i have noticed that exhibit this freedom most often include "J", "Q", "Z" and "z". – barbara beeton Sep 25 '14 at 13:14
  • 1
    Take a look at tug.dk/FontCatalogue. Some of the TeX Gyre fonts are nice although I tend to use Latin Modern. – cfr Sep 25 '14 at 13:14
  • 1
    Libertine is quite similar to Baskerville (see the Baskervaldx package). It is related to older-style typefaces like Garamond (ebgaramond package) and Bembo (fbb). – musarithmia Mar 30 '16 at 21:28
7

That's just the way it is. Here's a look at the font table for that encoding/series/shape (OT1/m/it):

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{libertine,fonttable}
\begin{document}
\xfonttable{OT1}{LinuxLibertineT-TLF}{m}{it}
\end{document}
0

I know I am very late to the party, but I faced the same problem myself and I found a solution:

\newcommand{\saneJ}{\mathnormal{J}}

and of course you have to replace every J in your code with \saneJ.

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