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From the beginning it was not working. I first checked the commands pannel in the configuration and corrected it but to no avail. I selected my file in the pdflatex in the commands panel but there was a error.

Error: Could not start the command: "C:/Users/jisha1211/Desktop/document 3.tex" -synctex=1 -interaction=nonstopmode "document 3".tex

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  • Welcome to TeX.SX! You can have a look at our starter guide to familiarize yourself further with our format.
    – Aradnix
    Oct 4, 2014 at 2:59
  • Please help us to help you and add a minimal working example (MWE) that illustrates your problem. It will be much easier for us to reproduce your situation and find out what the issue is when we see compilable code, starting with \documentclass{...} and ending with \end{document}. You might also want to add to your question how you're including the pdfs etc.
    – Aradnix
    Oct 4, 2014 at 3:00
  • This happens anytime you try to compile any TeX document? We're probably going to need more information about your setup. What TeX distribution are you using, what editor, etc.. And welcome to TeX.SX!
    – Adam Liter
    Oct 4, 2014 at 3:00
  • What editor do you use? The problem seems to be the " " surrounding the name of the file (without extension).
    – Guido
    Oct 4, 2014 at 3:47
  • @guido - The double quotes would seem to be correct, as they serve to "protect" a space embedded in the file name. (Of course, it would be better if the file name didn't contain a space to begin with.)
    – Mico
    Oct 4, 2014 at 3:50

1 Answer 1

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There may be some fundamental confusion over what needs to run. You should probably run the command as

pdflatex -synctex=1 -interaction=nonstopmode "document 3".tex

I.e., pdflatex is the executable program, not document 3.tex. Since your tex file isn't executable, it's not surprising that the operating system throws an error.

You haven't indicated which front end (editing) program you use. Which program do you use, and how did you configure its "command panel"?

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