31

I would like to know how to format a pseudocode algorithm like the one shown in the picture below. I would like to see an example of Tex/Latex code that would mimic the style, formatting and design of the pseudocode illustrated on this picture. I know how to write simple pseudocode algorithms, but i don't know how to

  1. Align the pseudocode with an \item "Some text.."
  2. How to write a pseudocode with Input and Output exactly below the procedure/function so that they are not numbered and aligned with procedure/function
  3. How to use the block braces in form of "vertical lines"

enter image description here

My attempt

\documentclass[a4paper]{article}

\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage[colorinlistoftodos]{todonotes}
\usepackage{algorithm}
\usepackage{algpseudocode}

\usepackage{geometry}
 \geometry{
 a4paper,
 total={210mm,297mm},
 left=20mm,
 right=20mm,
 top=20mm,
 bottom=20mm,
 }

\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}

 \item Some text goes here . . .
  \begin{algorithm}
   \caption{Merge Sort}
    \begin{algorithmic}[1]
      \Function{Merge}{$A,p,q,r$}\Comment{Where A - array, p - left, q - middle, r - right}

        \State ${n_1} = q - p + 1$
        \State ${n_2} = r - q$
        \State Let $L[1 \ldots {n_1} + 1]$ and $R[1 \ldots {n_2} + 1]$ be new arrays
        \For{$i = 1$ to ${n_1}$}
            \State $L[i] = A[p + i - 1]$
        \EndFor
        \For{$j = 1$ to ${n_2}$}
            \State $R[i] = A[q + j]$
        \EndFor
        \State $L[{n_1} + 1] =  \infty $
        \State $R[{n_2} + 1] =  \infty $
        \State $i = 1$
        \State $j = 1$
        \For{$k = p$ to $r$}
            \If {$L[i] < R[j]$}
                \State $A[k] = L[i]$
                \State $i = i + 1$
            \ElsIf {$L[i] > R[j]$}
                \State $A[k] = R[j]$
                \State $j = j + 1$
            \Else
                \State $A[k] = - \infty$ \Comment{We mark the duplicates with the largest negative integer}
                \State $j = j + 1$
            \EndIf
        \EndFor
       \EndFunction

\end{algorithmic}
\end{algorithm}
\end{enumerate}
\end{document}

My result enter image description here

Comments

  1. As you can see i don't know how to align the algorithm with the itemized text.
  2. I don't know how to place Input and Output words below the function, so that they are not numbered and aligned with a function.
  3. I like more the style of vertical line block, rather than just condition:end.

I'm new to writing pseudocode algorithms with Latex, but i suspect the style and formatting i'm looking for is in the package algorithm2e. Can someone show me how to achieve the following result:

enter image description here

I want to learn to write pseudocode algorithm in the same style as in the picture above.

4
  • I want to get the exact style as on the picture. For example, how can i write "Input" and "Output" below the function. In other words i want to see the Latex code that will mimic the style, design and formatting of the pseudocode illustrated on the picture.
    – user_777
    Oct 5, 2014 at 2:51
  • @user_777: How about, as a starting point, show us some effort from your end via a minimal working example (MWE). Start by looking into the algorithm2e package.
    – Werner
    Oct 5, 2014 at 4:48
  • @Werner Updated my post and showed my efforts...
    – user_777
    Oct 6, 2014 at 8:23

1 Answer 1

42

Here it is:

enter image description here

Code:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage[linesnumbered,ruled]{algorithm2e}

\begin{document}
\begin{algorithm}
    \SetKwInOut{Input}{Input}
    \SetKwInOut{Output}{Output}

    \underline{function Euclid} $(a,b)$\;
    \Input{Two nonnegative integers $a$ and $b$}
    \Output{$\gcd(a,b)$}
    \eIf{$b=0$}
      {
        return $a$\;
      }
      {
        return Euclid$(b,a\mod b)$\;
      }
    \caption{Euclid's algorithm for finding the greatest common divisor of two nonnegative integers}
\end{algorithm}
\end{document} 

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