2

Referring to the question how to cite web pages what is the best approach if you use Citavi and want to get an "Access date" added?

I got Citavi to add the access date to notes, but I couldn't add an "accessed:" pre-string.

How can I, fit my needs and a) add the access date straight after the author (in braces)
Deutsche Börse AG (07.01.2002): Deutsche Börse - Die verschiedenen Indizes, http://www.exchange.de/fwb.indices.html.

or if this is to tough
b) add an accessed string via citavi or latex?
Deutsche Börse AG. 2002. Deutsche Börse - Die verschiedenen Indizes, http://www.exchange.de/fwb.indices.html. Accessed 07.01.2002

I use this LaTeX-Template which uses this *.bst file for transforming bibtex.

Maybe just adding something to the *.bst file is the easiest option?


Edit: Following @Micos recommendation I add the corresponding *.bib entry:

@misc{OMG.2014,
 author = {OMG},
 year = {2014},
 title = {{About the Object Management Group}},
 url = {http://www.omg.org/gettingstarted/gettingstartedindex.htm},
 keywords = {technology standards consortium;technology standards;MDA;UML;CORBA;Unicode;ISO PAS;ITU-T;Heathcare;Legal;Life Sciences Research;Government;Finance;C4I;Robotics;technical meetings;tutorials;specifications;computer technology},
 note = {05.10.2014}
}
  • It would be helpful if you showed the complete bib entry that gives rise to the two forms of the typeset entries shown in your posting? – Mico Oct 5 '14 at 17:13
3

It looks like the bibliography style file ormsv080.bst was created with the makebst utility. As such, it is unfortunately not programmed to recognize -- and will therefore ignore -- a field named, say, last-accessed-date or access-date.

If you want to stick with this particular bibliography style, you'll need to change the field

note = {05.10.2014}

to

note = {Accessed on 05.10.2014}

I'm afraid it's not a good idea to edit the bst file itself to prefix "Accessed on " to the contents of the note field, as the note field can contain just about any kind of information, not just the date a given entry was last accessed on. The good news is that you'll need to make this edit only once (assuming you don't access this site repeatedly, of course).

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{filecontents}
\begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib}
@misc{OMG.2014,
 author = {OMG},
 year = {2014},
 title = {{About the Object Management Group}},
 url = {http://www.omg.org/gettingstarted/gettingstartedindex.htm},
 keywords = {technology standards consortium;technology standards;MDA;UML;CORBA;Unicode;ISO PAS;ITU-T;Heathcare;Legal;Life Sciences Research;Government;Finance;C4I;Robotics;technical meetings;tutorials;specifications;computer technology},
 note = {Accessed on 05.10.2014}
}
\end{filecontents*}
\bibliographystyle{ormsv080}
\usepackage{natbib,url}
\begin{document}
As argued by \cite{OMG.2014}, \dots
\bibliography{\jobname}
\end{document}
  • Hm .. I see. Thats what I expected :( Thanks for your recommendation. I thought manipulating a *.bst file is an option. – lony Oct 6 '14 at 7:04
  • 1
    @lony - "Manipulating a bst file" means (a) creating new field types and (b) modifying the many functions that format the entries to recognize and typeset the contents of these fields. Moreover, if and when you switch to a different .bst file -- say, because a journal requires you to use their house style file -- you'd either have to start over with the new bst file or (if you're not allowed to modify the style file...) go back and edit the contents of the note field after all. In short, modifying the contents of the note fields suitably is less work both the short and long run. – Mico Oct 6 '14 at 7:29

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