10

How do I setup my document such that my equations can look like this: 1 Specifically, I'm after the shape: 2 rather than: 3, which is generated with the mathptmx package.

Any ideas?

  • Liberation Serif gives the Z glyph depicted in your question as what you are after. Liberation fonts are designed to be free/libre fonts that are metric-compatible to Times New Roman. – ignis Oct 8 '14 at 10:45
11

One option, using the MathTime Pro II fonts. Unfortunately, the free lite version does not provide a large number of symbols.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{newtxtext} % just for the text font
\usepackage[lite]{mtpro2}

\begin{document}
The equation is
$z^4 - 2z^2 + 4 = 0$, 
with $z \in C$.
\end{document}

enter image description here

  • It seems like a viable alternative; thanks for your help! – Alex Oct 7 '14 at 22:50
10

I'd use the curly italic ‘z’, but an alternative could be using the one from the slanted font:

\documentclass{article}
%\usepackage{newtxtext,newtxmath}
\usepackage{mathptmx}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{accents}

% use the slanted z instead of the italic one in math    
\DeclareSymbolFont{zed}{OT1}{\familydefault}{m}{sl}
\SetSymbolFont{zed}{bold}{OT1}{\familydefault}{m}{sl}
\DeclareSymbolFontAlphabet{\mathsl}{zed}
\DeclareMathSymbol{z}{\mathalpha}{zed}{`z}

% some utility commands
\newcommand{\diff}{\mathop{}\!d}
\newcommand{\utilde}[1]{\underaccent{\tilde}{#1}}

\begin{document}

\begin{gather*}
\int_{0}^{1}\frac{x-5}{x^{2}-5x+6}\diff x
\\
y^{2}+\frac{3e^{(x-1)}}{x-2}+c
\\
\utilde{r}(t)=4\sec(t)\utilde{\mathrm{i}}+2\tan(t)\utilde{\mathrm{j}},
\quad
t\in\biggl[0,\frac{\pi}{2}\biggr)
\\
\{z:z\bar{z}=4, z\in C\}\cap\{z:\lvert z+\bar{z}\rvert=\lvert z-\bar{z}\rvert, z\in C\}
\\
z^{4}-2z^{2}+4=0,\quad z\in C
\\
\frac{1}{N}\frac{\diff N}{\diff t}+0.4\log_{e}(N)-2.4=0
\end{gather*}

\end{document}

It works with either mathptmx or newtx (just switch the comments)

enter image description here

  • I hadn't thought of using the slanted font. It's good to know there are a couple of options. – Alex Oct 7 '14 at 23:13
  • 2
    have you ever had to put a subscript on a curly 'z'? it's a real pain, better avoided. – barbara beeton Oct 8 '14 at 14:24

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