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Is there a good way to have a better looking dollar symbol \$ without altering the fonts of the rest of the text? The \$ in a default template just looks very dull. I would prefer to have a Fraktur style or Brush script style.

A MWE:

\documentclass[a4paper]{article}
\begin{document}
\fontsize{40}{40}
\selectfont
\[\$\]
\end{document}
13
  • 3
    Since \$ is a comand, yes, there's a good way: change the definition of that command, e.g. \renewcommand*\${..}. Now how to define it, well, since “better looking” is ambiguous, if you tell us which font do you want or what's exactly what you are looking for, it would be simpler.
    – Manuel
    Nov 4 '14 at 16:47
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    a minimal example is required if you want us to know what you are looking at: "\$ in a default template" could mean anything, whose template are you using, what fonts does it use? Nov 4 '14 at 16:50
  • 1
    To amplify what @DavidCarlisle said: Without knowledge of the font you currently use, it's quite pointless to speculate about which dollar symbols might look better than the one you already have.
    – Mico
    Nov 4 '14 at 16:54
  • 5
    @TroyWoo most people who mean article class say article class, most people who say "a default template" mean some thesis template provided by their university. Nov 4 '14 at 18:31
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    @TroyWoo Okey, so I want to help. What do I do? First, read the question, as I stated before you say “better looking dollar” which is far from objective. Okey, a few words later you say “fraktur dollar”; that seems more acceptable. But wait… what's that? Okey, I guess I need to Google it. So I Google it and I have tons of images, all of them different from each other, with dollar symbols that, seems to me, would look awful with normal text. So I guess you are not being specific enough.
    – Manuel
    Nov 4 '14 at 19:45
5

There are thousands of fonts and a good number of those have a S sign, it's hard to know what to suggest, here's a few...

enter image description here

\documentclass[a4paper]{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{tgpagella}
\usepackage{tgbonum}
\DeclareMathSymbol{\dd}{\mathalpha}{letters}{`$}
\begin{document}

\showoutput
\[
\$
\textit{\fontfamily{cmr}\selectfont\$}
\textit{\fontfamily{qpl}\selectfont\$}
\textit{\$}
\]


\end{document}

the odd markup is just so I could select different fonts in the same run, normally you'd just pick a font and let it set up \$

1
  • Thanks, I guess now I will try not to use the symbol at all. It looks awful anyway.
    – Troy Woo
    Nov 4 '14 at 21:37
2

If you want a Fraktur or Semi-Fraktur dollar sign, see the Rotunda capital S:

enter image description here

However, I have not been able to find a matching font file.

Take a look at the dollar sign in http://www.abstractfonts.com/font/14113/charmap?frameless=1&rndint=4637722&brief=1. This is only one typeface in http://www.abstractfonts.com/category/31/Calligraphy. Several others have interesting dollar signs.

3
  • Welcome to TeX.SX! Is this supposed to be an answer to the question? I think it isn't. This is not a forum, but a “questions and answers” site; if you have a new question, please ask it as such, with a link to this question, but, please, don't use this space which is reserved for answers. Don't worry, it happens to people coming to the site for the first time and are not used to the format.
    – egreg
    May 20 '15 at 22:49
  • If you have a new question, please ask it by clicking the Ask Question button. Include a link to this question if it helps provide context.
    – egreg
    May 20 '15 at 22:50
  • I thin I fixed this. May 20 '15 at 23:08

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