5

I was under the impression that csquotes provides support for American-style punctuation, whereby a punctuation mark adjacent to a closing quotation mark is moved inside, not outside, the quotation marks. For example:

"What's in a name," asked Juliet.

However, the following MWE does not produce this result:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[american]{babel}

\usepackage[autostyle=true, autopunct=true]{csquotes}

\listfiles

\begin{document}

\enquote{What's in a name}, asked Juliet.

\end{document}

Which is typeset incorrectly as:

"What's in a name", asked Juliet.

Am I missing a parameter setting, or does csquotes not provide such support?

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  • 3
    the autopunct system is for quotes with citations. E.g. \textquote uses it. It is not used for the simpler \enquote. Nov 13, 2014 at 9:59
  • Which means that there is no built-in way for csquotes to enforce American-style punctuation on standard quotations (without citations)? Nov 13, 2014 at 10:14
  • @macula: indeed, there seems to be no such arrangement. istm that csquotes is rather heavy going for a single-language document. (fwiw, although one might expect the author to correct such an omission if it was pointed out to him, but since he's been incommunicado for so long that the chances seem small; everyone assumes he's given up or is otherwise incapable of responding.) Nov 13, 2014 at 11:37

1 Answer 1

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You could try something like this. But I didn't check carefully if it does the expected thing with the other quoting commands.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[american]{babel}

\usepackage[autostyle,autopunct=true]{csquotes}

\listfiles
\begin{document}
\renewcommand{\mktextquote}[6]{%
#1#2\ifblank{#4}{#5}{#4}#3#6}

\let\enquote\textquote
\enquote{What's in a name}, asked Juliet.

\end{document}
5
  • Certainly looks sensible and convincing enough for me to try it out. enquote is the only csquotes command that I use right now, which makes it likely that your solution will suffice. Nov 13, 2014 at 12:26
  • depending on the topic of the document, this could be dangerous: "after reading the instructions, answer either \enquote{yes} or \enquote{no}." do you want the period after "no" to be part of the typing instruction? NO (american quotes aren't always the right thing to do.) Nov 13, 2014 at 14:53
  • @barbarabeeton: That's the problem with automatic solutions ;-). There are always cases where one must disable them. One can use \enquote{no}{}. or \enquote{no}\relax. in such cases. Or one define a \autopunctenquote. Nov 13, 2014 at 15:39
  • @Ulrike -- i know that you know that. just wanted to put it on the record, so some unsuspecting soul who thinks it's a great idea doesn't get caught flatfooted. (it was the cause of a great brouhaha at ams when a copyeditor changed all my "type this" instructions in a manual to move the punctuation inside the quotes. i won the argument finally, but only after i had her actually try out what she had asked for.) Nov 13, 2014 at 16:14
  • @barbarabeeton: I knew that you knew that I know that ;-). I only wanted to add the info how to get around the problem. Nov 13, 2014 at 19:46

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