13

I use {align*} a lot, it seems that the block of {align*} are automatically centered. How could I shift the block towards the left margin to some spaces? (I.e. not all the way to left, but just some spaces towards left.)

It is different from here.

4
  • It's not really clear why you want this in the first place. Can you explain?
    – egreg
    Dec 5, 2014 at 22:32
  • I need it because after the second text (heading) the use of align* doesn't properly centers the equation or it seems that equation is way too right. That's why I want to shift it a little left of my choice.
    – kaka
    Dec 5, 2014 at 22:50
  • An example would be useful.
    – egreg
    Dec 5, 2014 at 22:55
  • \textbf{Detection Problem} \begin{align*} \mathcal{H}_0: \textbf{y}[n]&=\textbf{w}[n], && n=1, \cdots N,\\ \end{align*} where; \textbf{x}[n] represents primary user signal, \textbf{w}[n] is additive zero-mean. \\~\\ \textbf{For simplicity of notation} \begin{align*} \mathcal{H}_0: \textbf{y}&=\textbf{w}, \hspace*{2.0cm}\\ \mathcal{H}_1: \textbf{y}&=\textbf{x}+\textbf{w}. \end{align*} \\~\\ where; $\textbf{w} \sim \mathcal{N}(\textbf{0}, \sigma^2\textbf{I} )$ \end{frame}
    – kaka
    Dec 5, 2014 at 23:41

2 Answers 2

10

You can add additional space to the right hand side of the equation via \hspace:

enter image description here

Code:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{showframe}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
\noindent
This is centered:
\begin{align*}
a &=b
\end{align*}
Adding a \verb|\hspace{2.0cm}| to right hand side:
\begin{align*}
a &=b \hspace{2.0cm}
\end{align*}
\end{document} 
1
  • note that you can also add negative space before the equation instead of adding after, also if there are several lines you need to do it for each line.
    – YannickSSE
    Jul 18, 2018 at 6:25
7

mathtools provides \MoveEqLeft[<number>] for this. Put the macro at the end of first line.

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{mathtools}

\begin{document}
    \begin{align*}
     x &=  x_ot+v_ot+\frac{1}{2}at^2 \\
    v &= v_ot+at \\
    v^2 &= v_o^2+2a \Delta x
    \end{align*}
    \begin{align*}
     x &=  x_ot+v_ot+\frac{1}{2}at^2 \MoveEqLeft[1]\\
    v &= v_ot+at \\
    v^2 &= v_o^2+2a \Delta x
    \end{align*}
\end{document}

enter image description here

2
  • It's probably better to use \tfrac instead of \frac in the first of the three rows.
    – Mico
    Dec 4, 2014 at 7:08
  • That is a bit misuse of \MoveEqLeft, though I do not understand the OPs intention with the question.
    – daleif
    Dec 4, 2014 at 8:32

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