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I have one problem with my project. I want to insert soft return. If I insert \\ the text is not fully justified. Can I insert soft return like in MS Word?

example

I have no idea how to fully justify first line. I used \\ before 'It' word.

  • Hi and welcome to TeX.SX. As a non-W0rd user i have to ask, what is a soft-return? – Johannes_B Dec 6 '14 at 13:58
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    Just let TeX decide the line breaks. The so called “soft return” is a plague. – egreg Dec 6 '14 at 13:58
  • What exactely are you trying to acieve? Are you looking for a \linebreak? – Johannes_B Dec 6 '14 at 13:58
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    In your picture, the first line isn't justified either. How does \\ differ from what you show in that picture? – Sverre Dec 6 '14 at 13:59
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    Why would you want to "fully justify" the first line? It's clearly not wide enough to fill up the entire line -- unless you make the interword whitespace amount absurdly large. Put differently, why don't you just remove the `\` line break and let TeX decide how the typeset the entire paragraph? – Mico Dec 6 '14 at 14:10
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I suspect that I'm missing something very important. If you want to make a document look like it was generated by MS Word, why employ (La)TeX? Much more straightforward to use MS Word, isn't it?

Using \linebreak "works" -- but at the high cost of making the paragraph look pitiful.

enter image description here

\documentclass[a4paper]{scrartcl}
\usepackage{newtxtext} % text font: Times Roman clone
\setlength\parindent{0pt} % just for this example
\begin{document}
normal spacing in paragraph:

\medskip
Mineral aerosol represents one of the largest mass fractions of the global aerosol. It consists of windblown soil and is produced mainly in the arid areas of our planet, in particular in the great deserts. Its annual production rate is estimated to be in the order of \dots

\bigskip
using \verb+\linebreak+ after first sentence:

\medskip
Mineral aerosol represents one of the largest mass fractions of the global aerosol. \linebreak It consists of windblown soil and is produced mainly in the arid areas of our planet, in particular in the great deserts. Its annual production rate is estimated to be in the order of \dots
\end{document}
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    "If you want to make a document look like it was generated by MS Word, why employ (La)TeX?" The package wordlike already do that easily, why employ MS Word? :) – Fran Dec 6 '14 at 22:03
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    @Fran - wordlike still needs serious "help" to make a document look as amateurishly typeset as, well, you know which software suite I'm thinking about. :-) – Mico Dec 6 '14 at 22:28
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    The goal of the package is only "look like" , not ruin everything. :) – Fran Dec 7 '14 at 5:07
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As suggested by @Johannes_B in a comment, I used \linebreak instead of \\ and my problem has gone.

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  • I think you got downvoted here because you essentially just took one of the comments to your question and posted it as an answer. – Sverre Dec 6 '14 at 14:59
  • @Sverre To be honest, i don't care. Wasn't me. :-) – Johannes_B Dec 6 '14 at 16:55
  • Your original problem has gone but you have the new problem that the line will be stretched to the point that it's unreadabe. Why not let tex wrap the lines as normal? – David Carlisle Dec 6 '14 at 23:44
  • @DavidCarlisle. Unreadable? 8-) For many people the "gold standard" is text without hyphens and ridiculous stretching (because, of course, they want a justified right margin). Only three decades of word processors have damaged seriously the typographic habits. – Fran Dec 7 '14 at 5:55

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