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I apologize if this has been asked before, but I did some searching and could not find an answer as it is hard to word the question without providing a picture. MWE

I was wondering how the author got the text to look like that under 1. INTRODUCTION, and 2. UNIVERSAL ENVELOPING ALGEBRAS?

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4 Answers 4

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centred caps and small caps headings, look like amsart class to me.

\documentclass{amsart}
\begin{document}
 \section{Introduction}
\end{document}
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  • Is there any way to get it without using amsart? I would prefer not to change my enter document class.
    – MathMajor
    Commented Dec 7, 2014 at 23:43
  • 2
    @GabrielH yes of course see the links in the first comment which are various ways of customizing headings, I just posted this simple version as the image looks like amsart to me, and if you wanted that it's easier to specify amsart than something else that has to be customised. Commented Dec 7, 2014 at 23:50
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With sectsty, another way.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{sectsty}
\sectionfont{\centering\normalfont\scshape}
%\allsectionsfont{\centering\normalfont\scshape}  % for all sectional levels
\usepackage{lipsum}
\begin{document}
    \section{Introducton}
    \lipsum[1]
    \section{Another Section}
    \lipsum[2]
\end{document}

enter image description here

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A solution that uses all the tools of titlesec:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[textwidth=140mm, textheight=213mm, marginratio={4:6,5:7}]{geometry}
\usepackage{amsmath, amsfonts, amssymb}
\DeclareMathOperator\GL{\mathfrak{gl}}
\DeclareMathOperator\chr{char}
\usepackage[noindentafter]{titlesec}

\titleformat{\section}[block]{\filcenter\scshape}{\thesection.}{0.5em}{}
\titlespacing*{\section}{0pt}{2\baselineskip}{1\baselineskip}

\begin{document}

\section{Introduction}

Let $ L $ be a finite dimensional Lie algebra over the field $ F $. By a finite-dimensional representation, we mean a Lie algebra homomorphism $ φ \colon L → \GL(V)$ for some vector space $ V $ with $ \dim V < ∞ $. When $ φ $ is injective, $ φ $ is said to be a \emph{faithful} representation. If $ L $ has a faithful representation, then we can view elements of $ L$ as matrices with entries in $ F $. It is natural to ask whether every finite dimensional Lie algebra can be concretely realized in this way. Ado [1] gave an affirmative answer when $ \chr(F) = 0$. The result was extended by Iwasawa [2] to cover the case $ \chr(F) = p $ for prime $ p $. We follow Fulton and Harris [3] to give the proof for the case $ \chr(F) = 0 $.

\section{Universal Enveloping Algebras}

\end{document} 

enter image description here

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\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[explicit]{titlesec}
\titleformat{\section}{\normalfont}{\thesection}{1em}{\centering\textsc{#1}}
\usepackage{lipsum}
\begin{document}
    \section{Introducton}
    \lipsum[1]
    \section{Another Section}
    \lipsum[2]
\end{document}

Example

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