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The trfsigns package provides macros for transformation signs, eg: \fourier and \laplace.

enter image description here

I need a vertical version of those symbols.

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  • These symbols (horizontal or vertical) are also part of the Comprehensive LaTeX Symbol List (Table 72, p 31, amongst others, possibly). For me this is a duplicate of How to look up a symbol or identify a math symbol or character?
    – Werner
    Dec 17, 2014 at 0:38
  • Didn't knew about the symbols from the cited table. However, they are pretty small compared to those from the trfsigns package.
    – dersimn
    Dec 17, 2014 at 0:51
  • It already exists as a Metafont font in the trsym package. There it's a binary relation symbol.
    – Bernard
    Dec 17, 2014 at 0:54
  • @SimonD.Seim: Pretty small can be resized using graphicx and put in a macro as a \mathrel, if needed.
    – Werner
    Dec 17, 2014 at 0:55

1 Answer 1

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enter image description here

\documentclass[a4paper,oneside,12pt]{report}

\usepackage{trfsigns} % Transformation Symbol o---o \laplace and \Laplace

\usepackage[fleqn]{amsmath}

\newcommand{\vlaplace}[1][]{\mbox{\setlength{\unitlength}{0.1em}%
                            \begin{picture}(10,20)%
                              \put(3,2){\circle{4}}%
                              \put(3,4){\line(0,1){12}}%
                              \put(3,18){\circle*{4}}%
                              \put(10,7){#1}
                            \end{picture}%
                           }%
                     }%

\newcommand{\vLaplace}[1][]{\mbox{\setlength{\unitlength}{0.1em}%
                            \begin{picture}(10,20)%
                              \put(3,2){\circle*{4}}%
                              \put(3,4){\line(0,1){12}}%
                              \put(3,18){\circle{4}}%
                              \put(10,7){#1}
                            \end{picture}%
                           }%
                     }%                     

\begin{document}

\[ s(t) = stuff \]
\[\vlaplace\]
\[ S(f) = otherstuff \]
\[\vLaplace[Used Rule No. 1 from Table No. 7] \]
\[ s(t) = again \]

\end{document}
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  • I think, you did this the other way around. The black dot should be on the Laplace side Apr 11, 2021 at 14:01

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