4

Could someone please let me know how to include the s-with-a-hat character (\^{s}) within a square root. I hoped $\sqrt{ \^{s} }$ would do the job.

  • 1
    this is unrelated to square root, you need hat rather than ^ in math mode. – David Carlisle Jan 3 '15 at 13:25
1

Building on @karlkoeller 's answer - you can use \text and \emph in math mode. This may not get the italicized variable names quite right. Clearly needs work for accents below the letter.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
$\sqrt{\hat{s}}$ $\sqrt{\text{\emph{\"s}}}$ 
$\sqrt{\text{\emph{\v{s}}}}$ $\sqrt{\text{\emph{\c{s}}}}$
\end{document} 
  • 1
    I'd prefer $\sqrt{\ddot{s}}$ to $\sqrt{\text{\emph{\"s}}}$, at least for situations that involve the second derivative with respect to time... The placement of the cedilla below the italic-s is much improved by loading either the lmodern package or the fontenc package with option T1, by the way. – Mico Jan 3 '15 at 14:18
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    Sorry, but this is wrong. It could be only for the cedilla, but for hat, double dot and check accents, one should use \hat{s}, \ddot{s} and \check{s}. Note also that $\sqrt{\text{\emph{\"s}}}$ would result in an upright s when in the statement of a theorem or anywhere italics is used. – egreg Jan 3 '15 at 14:41
  • @egreg I knew (and said) the \emph was a hack. Without knowing the OP's use cases I don't know whether that's a problem. – Ethan Bolker Jan 3 '15 at 15:31
10

Probably you are looking for the \hat command.

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}
$\sqrt{\hat{s}}$
\end{document} 

enter image description here

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