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The numbering of the sentences shows as underlined dots when using \ag. \a. \b. of linguex and tipa . \bg. works fine but starts numbering from (a.)

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{linguex}
\usepackage[main=english,italian,spanish,portuguese,catalan]{babel}
%babel has problems with french - tried frenchle does't work either
\usepackage{harvard}
\bibliographystyle{agsm}
\usepackage{tipa}
\usepackage{hyperref}
\begin{document}

\section{Catalan}
text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text (English)

\ex. \label{cat2}
\ag. en Joan t\'e m\'es vaques que en Pere. (NP-comparison)\\
D John have.3SG more cows than D Peter\\
John has more cows than Peter. \cite{Hualde2002}
\bg. t' estimo m\'es que la Maria.\\
CL.2s love more that the Mary\\
I love you more than Mary. \cite{Hualde2002}
\bg. en Joan \'es m\'es alt que la Maria. (AdjP-Comparison)\\
D John is more tall that D Maria\\
John is taller than Mary \cite{Hualde2002}

\section{English}

\ex. \a. This is an English example. 
\b. This is an English example.

\end{document}    
1
  • 1
    Load linguex after tipa. However, this might cause malfunctions. – egreg Jan 4 '15 at 17:38
6

The problem is not actually with the tipa package itself, but with basically any font package you would load. The problem is caused by the fact that linguex defines a \b. and and \c. macro, but both of these are used as diacritic commands (\b puts a macron under a character, and \c puts a cedilla. So loading the font package after linguex removes the linguex definitions.

The problem, however, is indeed solved by loading the font package before loading linguex. Since linguex defines these macros as delimited macros requiring a . after them, no interaction will arise with the font commands provided you wrap their arguments in braces. ({}). (See How bad for TeX is omitting braces {}, even if the result is the same? for more on why this is generally a good idea.)

Here are two minimal example documents that show exactly how this works. Notice that in the first example, the first two sublist labels are a . with a macron underneath, but the third (made with \c.) is a . with a cedilla under it.

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{linguex}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\begin{document}
% linguex examples fail
\ex.\label{1}
\a. An example
\b. Another example
\c. Another example

% font commands work unbraced
\Large\centering
\b a \c c 
\end{document}

output sample 1

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{linguex}

\begin{document}
% linguex examples work
\ex.\label{1}
\a. An example
\b. Another example

% font commands only work braced
\Large\centering
\b{a} \c{c} 
% font commands DON’T work unbraced (uncomment to produce error)
%\b a \c c 
\end{document}

output of sample 2

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