9

Having searched around I couldn't find a package that could produce the following integral sign.

enter image description here

How do I produce this bold looking vertical symbol? Xe-/LuaTeX are totally fine with me.

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
$\int_a^b$ 
\end{document}
  • What size do you want? If you want to center a formula just use \[\int_{min}^{max} f(x) dx\] for example. – Sigur Jan 8 '15 at 10:03
  • Times truetype font – yolo Jan 8 '15 at 10:23
  • Yes XeTeX and LuaTeX – yolo Jan 8 '15 at 10:35
  • Possible duplicate of Load integral sign from eulervm – Henri Menke Dec 8 '16 at 19:30
7

With Lua- or XeLaTeX you can use the package unicode-math and substitute single symbols easily. Just download any font you like and use it like:

% arara: lualatex

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\setmathfont{Latin Modern Math}
\setmathfont[range="222B]{Linux Libertine O} % or any font you like

\begin{document}    
    $\int_{a}^{b}\displaystyle\int_{a}^{b}\int\limits_{a}^{b}$
\end{document}

enter image description here

Other fonts for this case. You might want to replace the other integral signs as well. Linux Libertine covers U+222B to U+222E.

% arara: lualatex

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\setmathfont{Latin Modern Math}
\setmathfont[range={"222B-"2230}]{Linux Libertine O}

\begin{document}    
    $\int\iint\iiint\oint$
\end{document}

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • Have to use this in a math environment. Currently using mathptmx but symbols are being produced using CM – yolo Jan 8 '15 at 10:12
  • I could not get it to load using \DeclareSymbolFont{fnt}{T1}{libertine}{m}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{\intop}{\mathop}{fnt}{"222B}` – yolo Jan 8 '15 at 11:49
  • Error Limit controls must follow a math operator $\int – yolo Jan 8 '15 at 11:53
  • @yolo please see my update. – LaRiFaRi Jan 8 '15 at 12:15
  • Thanks, I am able to produce these symbols but for some odd reason other symbols like \infty or \lambda are not appearing now. Any idea why. Just use the code you just gave me and try a symbol outside the range. – yolo Jan 8 '15 at 15:37
3

Employing a variation of my answer at Integral Sign $\int...$, I define a new operator \uint and show the comparison to \int in the MWE below.

This approach takes a traditional \scriptstyle integral sign, rotates it 8 degrees, and scales it up to the same vertical extent as a normal integral sign when employed in the current mathstyle.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\DeclareMathOperator*{\uint}{\scalerel*{\rotatebox{8}{$\!\scriptstyle\int\!$}}{\int}}
\usepackage{scalerel}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\parskip 1ex
\begin{document}
\[ 
f=\int_0^t A d\tau =\uint_0^t A d\tau
\]
\centering
\(
f=\int_0^t A d\tau =\uint_0^t A d\tau
\)\par
\(
\scriptstyle f=\int A d\tau =\uint A d\tau
\)\par
\(
\scriptscriptstyle f=\int A d\tau =\uint A d\tau
\)
\end{document}

enter image description here

If the integral sign is perceived as just a bit too bold, then the we can scale a \textstyle integral sign instead:

\DeclareMathOperator*{\uint}{\scalerel*{\rotatebox{8}{$\!\textstyle\int\!$}}{\int}}

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |

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