52

If you have mathematic theorems that have more than one conclusion how do you list them this way:

(i) First conclusion here

(ii) Second conclusion here

(iii) Third conclusion here

effectively? I do it manually but it doesn't look good. Enumerate doesn't work either.

62

Use enumitem package

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumitem}   

\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}[label=(\roman*)]
\item First item
\item Second item
\item Third item
\end{enumerate}
\end{document}

example screenshot

Another solution is to use the enumerate package:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumerate}   

\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}[(i)]
\item First item
\item Second item
\item Third item
\end{enumerate}
\end{document}

See daleif answer to learn more about advantages of enumitem over enumerate.

Note that if you're using the beamer class, you don't need to load any extra package (the enumerate package is actually automatically loaded):

\documentclass{beamer}

\begin{document}
\begin{frame}
\begin{enumerate}[(i)]
\item First item
\item Second item
\item Third item
\end{enumerate}
\end{frame}
\end{document}

enter image description here

As mentioned is the comments, enumitem is not compatible with the beamer class unless you use the [shortlabels] option, as explained here: Possible incompatibility with enumitem

12

Here's a solution that doesn't require loading a package. Instead, the solution works by modifying two LaTeX macros, \labelenumi and \theenumi. The former determines how the item's "label" is shown, the latter affects how an item's number will be displayed in a cross-reference (arabic, roman, with or without parentheses, etc).

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\renewcommand\labelenumi{(\roman{enumi})}
\renewcommand\theenumi\labelenumi
\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}
\item First
\item Second \label{item:second}
\item Third
\end{enumerate}
Here's a cross-reference to item~\ref{item:second}.
\end{document} 
  • 1
    It should be noted that this has the benefit that you don't have to provide an option to enumerate each time you want the same kind of list. – Nagel May 4 '16 at 17:45
  • I tried your solution, it does not work with me. any suggestions? – Mohamed Dec 23 '18 at 1:08
  • @Mohamed - An observation such as "it does not work for me" is simply unactionable. What exactly isn't working? Are you getting warning and/or error messages? Which document class do you employ? Please be much more specific. Aside: I just re-ran the code shown above, and nearly four years since posting it, it still produces the result shown in the screenshot above... – Mico Dec 23 '18 at 3:04
10

Just to elaborate on Hugos answer, use the enumitem package it is a great package for configuring lists.

Manually just once use

\begin{enumerate}[label=(\roman*)]

It might be an idea to load enumitem with the shortlabels option:

\usepackage[shortlabels]{enumitem}

Then you can simply use

\begin{enumerate}[(i)]

A great feature is that if you now use \item\label{item:1} and then use \ref{item:1} then you get (i), that is the formatting is included! This is also configurable, see the enumitem manual.

Also lists can be resumed.

If you are writing a book using say, theorems, there are also general methods to add list configurations into theorems (I typically use etoolbox to do that). This means that inside theorem I just write \begin{enumerate} and we then control the appearance of enumerate inside theorem from the preamble.

Then the only time we explicitly need to set options on enumerate inside a theorem, would be if we have two types of lists in the theorem, say, one specifying conditions and then one listing subsequent conclusions. In such a case I'd let the conditions follow a different pattern.

  • You mean, \label=? – xxx--- May 21 '18 at 12:57
  • At @pushpen.paul what do you mean? No here \label is an option to enumerate and has nothing to do with \label (sort of), please read the enumitem manual – daleif May 21 '18 at 13:02
  • @daleif Why asterisk is needed in \roman*? – ado sar Aug 18 at 12:59
  • 1
    @adosar see the enumitem manual, roman normally takes an argument – daleif Aug 18 at 14:36

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